Yeshiva University Cancels Student Clubs After Supreme Court Ruling : NPR


People walk on the campus of Yeshiva University in New York on August 30. The school told students in an email that it was suspending all student clubs on campus.

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Yeshiva University Cancels Student Clubs After Supreme Court Ruling : NPR

People walk on the campus of Yeshiva University in New York on August 30. The school told students in an email that it was suspending all student clubs on campus.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Yeshiva University said it was suspending all student clubs on campus just days after the US Supreme Court refused to block a lower court ruling ordering the school to recognize an LGBTQ group .

In an unsigned email to students, the New York school said that in view of the upcoming Jewish holidays, “the university will suspend all undergraduate club activities while it takes immediate action to follow the roadmap provided by the U.S. Supreme Court to protect religious YU freedom. Warm wishes for a Shannah Tovah.”

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court asked Yeshiva to return to New York state court to continue its legal battle with the YU Pride Alliance, a group of LGBTQ students who want official recognition from the university. .

The YU Pride Alliance sued the school last year after Yeshiva refused to officially recognize it, saying it was in conflict with the school’s interpretation of Torah.

A New York state court ruled that the university must recognize the club, and the Supreme Court left that decision in place for the time being.

Pride Group lawyer calls Yeshiva’s decision ‘shameful’

Katie Rosenfeld, attorney for the YU Pride Alliance, said the decision to cancel all club activities “rather than accept an LGBTQ peer support group on campus is a throwback to 50 years ago , when the city of Jackson, Mississippi, closed all public swimming pools rather than comply with court desegregation orders.”

“We are confident that YU students will see through this shameful tactic and remain united in the community,” Rosenfeld added in a statement.

Yeshiva University did not immediately respond to NPR’s request for comment.

Earlier in the week, Yeshiva University President Rabbi Ari Berman said in a statement that the school would continue to pursue its case in court.

“Every faith-based university in the country has the right to work with its students, including its LGBTQ students, to establish the clubs, venues, and spaces that align with its religious tradition. Yeshiva University simply seeks that same right to self-determination,” Berman said.


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