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Writers Guild of America and Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers reach tentative agreement to end strike after nearly 5 months


After five months of deliberations, the Writers Guild of America reached a tentative agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, with the Guild warning: “No one shall return to work without express permission.”

The writers’ strike for fairer wages paralyzed Hollywood, and those who dared to continue production – including Drew Barrymore and Bill Maher – faced a huge backlash that prompted them to once again cancel their emissions.

But the WGA appears to have reached a tentative agreement with major studios, including Paramount, Sony and Universal, on September 24.

The agreement is expected to end one of two strikes that have halted most film and television production and cost the California economy billions.

The WGA released a statement praising union members for their determination and solidarity.

The strike began in early May, as writers voiced concerns over wages, staffing and other issues.

The WGA represents more than 11,000 writers and is divided into Western and Eastern chapters.

The WGA represents more than 11,000 writers and is divided into Western and Eastern chapters.

In its statement, the Guild congratulated union members and wrote:

In its statement, the Guild congratulated union members and wrote: “We can say, with great pride, that this agreement is exceptional.”

Although picketing was suspended, writers were advised not to return to work until explicitly asked to do so.

Although picketing was suspended, writers were advised not to return to work until explicitly asked to do so.

It read in part: “We can say, with great pride, that this agreement is exceptional – with significant gains and protections for writers in all sectors of our members. »

Before the three-year contract can take effect, it must be approved by the 11,500-strong WGA membership.

“So, as you have been patient with us before, we ask that you be patient again, one last time,” the Guild wrote.

The organization outlined a multi-step process to finalize the deal, culminating with leadership votes tentatively scheduled for September 26.

“Once the MOU with AMPTP is completed, the Negotiating Committee will vote on whether to recommend the agreement and send it to the WGAW Board of Directors and the WGAE Council for approval,” it says. the press release.

The board and council would then vote on whether to allow a contract ratification vote by the membership.

If the authorization is approved, the Board of Directors would also vote on whether to lift the restraining order and end the strike at a specific date and time.

This would allow writers to return to work during the ratification vote, but would not affect their ability to make a final decision regarding contract approval.

Following this process, the Guild would hold meetings to inform members of the agreement before they could vote on ratification.

However, writers were warned not to return to work “without express permission from the Guild”.

“We are still on strike until then. But we are suspending, effective immediately, the WGA picketing,” the statement said.

The strike began on May 2 after negotiations reached an impasse.

Writers have raised concerns about unfair pay, minimum staffing in writing rooms, the use of artificial intelligence and residual rewards rewarding writers for popular streaming shows.

Two months later, the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Radio and Television Artists (SAG-AFTRA) decided to stand in solidarity with the WGA.

Hollywood studios made what they claimed was their “best offer” in August.

The package presented by AMPTP on August 11 included the largest wage increase in more than three decades as well as protection against artificial intelligence and some residual wage increase.

It also included a commitment not to use AI-created content as literary material and to share the date of streaming viewing times.

But the WGA criticized it for “failing to sufficiently protect them.”

While this agreement marks the end of a months-long battle, the actors’ union SAG-AFTRA remains on strike.

With the WGA picket officially over, the Guild is instead encouraging writers to protest alongside actors.



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