Woman fired as Nikolas Cruz juror over ‘sugar daddy’ claim


Prospective juror who was kicked out of sentencing Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz after telling judge she was both married and had a ‘sugar daddy’ says she would have missed out on $8,000 per month as a panelist.

The woman, identified as “Miss Bristol,” said it would have been a financial “hardship” if she had been chosen for the jury, which will determine whether Cruz receives the death penalty or life in prison.

“If I deal with this case for six months, I have difficulties that mean my dad can’t support me,” she told WPLG on Saturday, adding that she would have lost $8,000 a month.

“It’s all day for six months and what is my difficulty? I need my daddy’s money. I told the judge, ‘I have a sugar daddy and I’m married and I have a husband,’ just like that,” Bristol said.

Last week, the woman shocked the courtroom when she told Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer why she shouldn’t be on the jury.

“I have my sugar daddy that I see every day,” the New York native said, confusing the judge. “I’m married and have my sugar daddy. I see it every day.”

Students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland after the gunman opened fire inside the school on February 14, 2018.
Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, file
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz sits at the defense table during jury screening during the penalty phase of his trial on April 11, 2022.
High school shooter Marjory Stoneman Douglas Nikolas Cruz sits at the defense table during jury screening during the penalty phase of his trial on April 11, 2022.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP, Pool

Meanwhile, jury selection descended into chaos on Monday when the judge dismissed an entire group of potential jurors after they collapsed in the presence of Cruz, who has already pleaded guilty to murdering 17 Marjory High School students. Stoneman Douglas in 2018.

When Scherer asked a tearful woman if everything was okay, she told the judge that her 15-year-old son had been the victim of gun violence and was allowed to leave the courtroom, WPLG reported.

More and more emotional potential jurors then began to leave the courtroom.

“The ladies and gentlemen who have been eliminated so far are such upset people that they can’t sit here without getting emotional and we don’t want to cause any trauma to anyone. If you absolutely can’t sit here without breaking down or getting emotional, you can raise your hand,” Scherer said.

"Miss Bristol" (left) claimed she could serve on the jury because it would prevent her from seeing her dad.
‘Miss Bristol’ (left) claimed she could serve on the jury as it would prevent her from seeing her dad.
WPLG
Judge Elizabeth Scherer during the jury screening phase of high school shooter Marjory Stoneman Douglas Nikolas Cruz.
Judge Elizabeth Scherer during the jury screening phase of high school shooter Marjory Stoneman Douglas Nikolas Cruz.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP, Pool

Shortly thereafter, the remaining members of the 60-person panel were fired and another 14-person group was recruited.

Ultimately, three people were chosen for the next round of jury selection, bringing the total to 147 chosen from a pool of 629, NBC Miami reported.

Jury selection continues Tuesday and Wednesday, with the sentencing trial set to begin May 31 and last until September, according to the outlet.

Judge Elizabeth Scherer addresses potential jurors during the third day of preliminary jury selection.
Judge Elizabeth Scherer addresses potential jurors during the third day of preliminary jury selection.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, Pool
An aerial view shows Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting in Parkland.
An aerial view shows Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting in Parkland.
REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Cruz pleaded guilty in October to 17 counts of first degree murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in connection with the massacre.

But the death penalty trial has been delayed after prosecutors said they needed more time to interview mental health experts who are expected to testify on behalf of high school killer Marjory Stoneman Douglas.

New York Post

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