Skip to content
With a history of cyberattacks, will Russia shift its revenge to the United States?


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

As tensions continue to escalate in Ukraine, many fear that Russia is transferring its revenge to the United States in the form of cyber warfare.

Fox Nation’s “Russia: The Cyber ​​Threat,” hosted by Kelly O’Grady, details the dark side of cybercrimes and reveals how “a few highly calculated lines of code could cripple an entire nation’s infrastructure.”

In his State of the Union address, President Biden issued a stark warning to Russia, warning it to avoid attacking American industries. However, as more and more countries step in to defend Ukraine, many fear that it means imminent retaliation.

CHINA ACCUSES US OF “BIOLOGICAL MILITARY ACTIVITIES” IN UKRAINE

Russia – which cybersecurity strategist Danielle Jablanski says is capable of “the most sophisticated” cyberattacks – has already demonstrated its dark capabilities on several occasions.

Just weeks before the Russian invasion of Ukraine, 70 government websites were targeted with messages threatening to expect worse.

In 2015, Ukraine’s electricity grid was hit, leaving 230,000 people without electricity. The hacker was able to take control of the systems remotely, thereby blocking the operator to cut the power.

In another case, malware spread to millions of computers around the world after it “blew up on Ukraine’s financial sector”, causing $10 billion in damage.

Recently, Microsoft “detected erasure malware targeting the Ukrainian government, ministries, and financial institutions,” O’Grady explained. The company’s detection systems identified the malware and updated to block the infected code, which was then shared with surrounding countries out of an abundance of caution.

“Without defending against malware like windshield wipers, what we would see is that the computers we use every day would not be accessible, the servers we rely on to provide transactions, or information banking or news would not be available,” said cybersecurity expert Christian Sorensen.

Although no cyberattack threats have yet been made against the United States, experts warn to be prepared.

“I think Vladimir Putin is already watching, hey, how can we retaliate against the United States in the West?” Cybersecurity expert and former hacker David Kennedy told Fox Nation. “We certainly need to be prepared on both critical infrastructure and finance, which are the two main areas that I think will be our first targets here in the United States.”

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity Division has previously responded to incidents that have affected government agencies, infrastructure, and private sector organizations.

“These hackers, later identified as members of the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service, used privileged access to collect and remove sensitive data, and even created backdoors to allow their return,” O’Grady reported.

Russia is capable of disabling or even destroying US satellites, cyber experts say. It would affect Americans by affecting agriculture automation, GPS navigation, and oil exploration.

CLICK HERE TO GET FOX NATION

Although Russia has capabilities against America, the United States is also capable of launching its own attacks. In fact, experts admit they don’t believe Russia would risk engaging the United States in a cyber war.

“It remains to be seen whether Russia will engage in full-scale cyber warfare against Ukraine and its allies,” O’Grady explained. “In modern warfare, anything is possible. One thing is certain: Russia is a cyber threat.

To learn more about the long history of cyberattacks in Russia, subscribe to fox nation and watch “Russia: The Cyber ​​Threat”.

fox nation programs are viewable on demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library of your favorite Fox News personalities.


foxnews

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.