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Will Netflix really be able to create appointment TV? : NPR

Jon Stewart and John Mulaney.

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Jon Stewart and John Mulaney.

Ryan West/Netflix

A week’s worth of live programming on Netflix ends tonight with the final episode of comic John Mulaney’s twisted talk show reinvention, Everybody’s in Los Angeles.

So it’s worth considering the double-edged results of the streamer’s attempt to create an avalanche of appointment TV in just seven days.

On the one hand, you have the juggernauts of Katt Williams Woke up FokThe live comedy special last Saturday, as well as last Sunday’s roast of champion quarterback Tom Brady – humbly billed as the greatest roast of all time.

The two specials dominated Netflix’s ratings charts this week, as Williams’ viral remarks and a parade of boldface names making tasteless jokes about Brady’s wealth, good looks and failed marriages kept the country in turmoil. (See below how Nikki Glaser stole the show with her barbed cracks on host Kevin Hart.)

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And then there’s John Mulaney.

Building an anti-talk show

In truth, my heart is completely with Mulaney’s decidedly bizarre project, which turns its back on many of the reasons you’d do a show like this live in the first place. He kicks off each episode by reminding viewers that he’s live without delay, citing the time and temperature.

But it doesn’t really give a reason why it provides this information and it doesn’t reference the news of the day or current events – things that can distinguish a live TV event. He answers calls with viewers’ questions — which makes sense for a live show — but often ends the conversation by asking them what car they drive. When they answer, he hangs up; no punchline or indication of why he asked the question.

Everybody’s in Los Angeles This actually seems like Mulaney’s attempt to create an anti-talk talk show, in the same way that David Letterman and Conan O’Brien deconstructed and ridiculed the basic tenets of television. It’s often a delightful dance between genuinely funny surprises and awkward moments, with experts on topics like palm trees and the paranormal alongside comics like Jerry Seinfeld, Jon Stewart, and Sarah Silverman.

Announcer/sidekick Richard Kind and a food delivery robot named Saymo.

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Announcer/sidekick Richard Kind and a food delivery robot named Saymo.

Ryan West/Netflix

But Mulaney’s show wore thin over time, becoming progressively less entertaining each night. Mulaney also discovered a painful truth about comedians who become television hosts; it’s difficult to ask questions of guests while still making it look entertaining.

A flex that suggests the future of live streaming

Mulaney’s Vanishing Experiment, along with the Brady Roast and the Williams Special, are part of the Netflix joke festival, which features hundreds of comedy shows across Los Angeles – a gigantic flex aimed at showing how the streamer has become the go-to destination for veteran and emerging comics.

But these plans also felt like a test of Netflix’s ability to deliver live programming without glitches, which would also rack up a lot of watch time.

It’s clear that there are two types of television programming where streamers still struggle to match the success of traditional platforms like broadcast networks and cable channels: live shows, including sporting events, and current affairs shows and talk shows. So it means something to see the most successful streaming service attempt to present multiple days of live programming with similar energy.

Netflix probably considers this week a big success. People are still talking about the Brady roast in other corners of the media, as participants appear on various television shows and podcasts. And they have more live content coming, including a July boxing match between Jake Paul, 27, and former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson, 57, and professional wrestling shows from WWE the next year.

There are even rumors that Netflix might find a way to get a professional NFL football game or two.

Indeed, while Netflix pioneered the idea of ​​binge-watching TV on a viewer’s schedule, it’s also clear that fans want appointment TV. These are shows so special that you have to watch them as they happen – either because you can’t wait, to avoid spoilers, or to have a shared experience.

The Williams, Brady and Mulaney shows prove that Netflix can deliver more of these moments. Charting what form this will take – and how their competitors respond – will likely be one of the biggest media stories of next year.

Gn entert
News Source : www.npr.org

Eleon

With a penchant for words, Eleon Smith began writing at an early age. As editor-in-chief of his high school newspaper, he honed his skills telling impactful stories. Smith went on to study journalism at Columbia University, where he graduated top of his class. After interning at the New York Times, Smith landed a role as a news writer. Over the past decade, he has covered major events like presidential elections and natural disasters. His ability to craft compelling narratives that capture the human experience has earned him acclaim. Though writing is his passion, Eleon also enjoys hiking, cooking and reading historical fiction in his free time. With an eye for detail and knack for storytelling, he continues making his mark at the forefront of journalism.
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