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Why Edward VIII visited Hitler: The author says his book will shed new light on the monarch’s maligned alliance with Nazi Germany and overturn his popular image as lazy and unintelligent.


An author has said her new book will overturn the popular image of Edward VIII as lazy and unintelligent and shine a light on his visit to Nazi Germany before the Second World War.

Jane Marguerite Tippett has spoken to the Telegraph about her upcoming book which will shed a “very different light” on Edward and look at his journey to Nazi Germany.

Edward renounced the throne in 1936, a year before his trip to Hitler, to marry divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson.

Edward and Wallis traveled to Germany and met the Führer in 1937 – although British officials strongly advised them against going there due to tensions between the two countries at the time. Two years later, World War II broke out.

Speaking about Edward’s trip to Germany to visit Hitler, Tippett told the outlet: “In the new material we understand better why he went to Germany, something that has been distorted in popular culture.

“It introduces some nuance when we see things from his perspective of what he thought he was doing in Germany. That’s not quite how his actions were translated.

Jane Marguerite Tippett has spoken to the Telegraph about her upcoming book which will shed a “very different light” on Edward and look at his journey to Nazi Germany in 1937.

Edward renounced the throne in 1936, a year before his trip to Hitler, to marry divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson.  In the photo: the couple

Edward renounced the throne in 1936, a year before his trip to Hitler, to marry divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson. In the photo: the couple

The author added that the series of photos of him with Hitler in 1937 “did not serve him well.”

In Germany, Edward was photographed giving the Nazi salute and later visited industrial plants and even a concentration camp, whose guard tours were allegedly explained to him as meat shops.

The former king is said to have declared as early as 1941 that Hitler was the “just and logical leader of the German people”.

It comes as a leading royal historian has claimed that classified documents from the Royal Archives suggest the exiled Duke of Windsor was a Nazi sympathizer who abandoned detailed plans for Buckingham Palace, allowing it to be bombed during the Second World War.

Speaking at the Oxford Literary Festival yesterday, royal expert Alexander Larman said that although he had access to the archive of a book about the royal family during the war, he was surprised by the level of condemnation launched against the Duke, revealing a The archivist had told him: “Our mission is not to protect the reputation of the Duke of Windsor.

He said: “The Nazis knew what they were doing and that’s because they had inside information (from the Duke).

“I don’t think he wanted to see him (his brother King George VI) dead, but he was in a position where he knew exactly where everyone was at Buckingham Palace.”

During the conflict, the palace suffered nine direct bombings and one death – PC Steve Robertson, a police officer serving there who was killed by flying debris in 1941.

Edward and Wallis traveled to Germany and met with the Führer – although British officials strongly advised them not to go due to tensions between the two countries at the time.  Two years later, World War II began

Edward and Wallis traveled to Germany and met with the Führer – although British officials strongly advised them not to go due to tensions between the two countries at the time. Two years later, World War II began

During his visit, the Duke was photographed inspecting German troops.

During his visit, the Duke was photographed inspecting German troops.

Edward's proposal to marry Wallis – while divorce proceedings from her second husband were still ongoing – sparked a constitutional crisis that culminated in Edward's decision to abdicate.  Pictured: The couple on their wedding day in 1937

Edward’s proposal to marry Wallis – while divorce proceedings from her second husband were still ongoing – sparked a constitutional crisis that culminated in Edward’s decision to abdicate. Pictured: The couple on their wedding day in 1937

Tippett’s book, Once a King, will also challenge the stereotypes that surrounded the former monarch.
Commenting on Netflix’s The Crown, Tippett also told the Telegraph: “That series was the apotheosis of this view of him as lazy, not intelligent, someone he never thought critically about of his life.”
In contrast, she says her book sheds a different light on Edward’s time as Prince of Wales before he became king.
She said that at that time he “was not lazy at all”, based on the fact that he had spent a year touring India and the East in 1919 and then was went to Canada for four months.
Tippett said that these days, royal tours only last a few days and she called Edward “the hardest-working British royal” at the time.

The author added that due to the former monarch’s abdication, the impact he had on the company and its development over the last century “has been erased.”

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