Health

Weight loss coach reveals 5 fitness habits that do more harm than good

They didn’t work.

Jenna Rizzo, a women’s weight loss coach from Georgia, shares five common fitness habits that she says have no effect on her body or mind.

“When I started, I literally knew nothing about fitness. I did what everyone else did and turned to social media for advice,” Rizzo revealed to his 77,300 TikTok followers in a clip last month.

“When I started, I literally knew nothing about fitness. I did what everyone else did and turned to social media for advice,” Rizzo revealed to his 77,300 TikTok followers in a clip last month. Tiktok.com/@jennaaaamariee

“I’ve adopted many healthy habits over the years, but there are many that have caused me far more harm than good,” she continued. “I’ll tell you what it is so you can progress much faster than me.”

Rizzo’s don’ts include going too hard at the gym, assigning rules to food, trying to be like someone else, using shame as a motivator, and not prioritizing sleep.

Going too hard at the gym

“You don’t need to go crazy at the gym multiple times a week,” Rizzo assured. “It won’t change your body like you think, and you’ll probably burn out very quickly. So I now tell my clients that we want to stimulate, not annihilate.

A 2021 study found that too much exercise can increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, which is an irregular heart rhythm. It is also linked to rhabdomyolysis, a rare disease characterized by extreme muscle breakdown. Symptoms include muscle pain or swelling, weakness or fatigue, and dark urine or little or no urine at all.

“You don’t need to go crazy at the gym multiple times a week,” Rizzo assured. “It won’t change your body like you think, and you’ll probably burn out very quickly. So I now tell my clients that we want to stimulate, not annihilate. instagram.com/jennaaaamariee

“Exertional rhabdomyolysis can occur after strenuous exercise and high-intensity workouts in which muscles are overused,” Dr. Niloofar Nobakht, associate clinical professor of nephrology at UCLA, said last year. “You can also get rhabdo from direct trauma, such as a crush injury from a car accident or fall.”

UCLA health experts recommend scheduling rest days, varying the intensity and duration of workouts, eating a balanced diet, staying hydrated and sleeping well to promote optimal fitness.

Assign rules to food

“Saying, ‘I’m not allowed to eat this because it’s bad,’ ‘I didn’t exercise today,’ or ‘I can only eat carbs in the morning and not in the morning.’ evening’, it’s obviously very harmful to your relationship with food,” Rizzo explained.

“It actually led me to develop a cycle of bingeing and restricting that it took me a long time to get out of,” she added. “No food is inherently good or bad. There are some that are less nutritious, others that are a little more nutritious, so go in with that mindset.

There’s no one-size-fits-all healthy diet, but experts agree that it’s important to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein, and dairy (or fortified alternatives to soy).

“At the end of the day, no matter how much you may like someone’s physique and say they’re body goals, you’re not going to look exactly like them,” Rizzo said. instagram.com/jennaaaamariee

Trying to be like someone else

“At the end of the day, no matter how much you may like someone’s physique and say they’re body goals, you’re not going to look exactly like them,” Rizzo said.

“You can eat exactly the same way they eat, you can train exactly the same way they train, and you won’t look like them,” she continued. “So put it out of your head: become the best version of yourself.”

Using shame as a motivator

“I would be very hard on myself if I ate something I wasn’t supposed to eat or if I missed a workout I wasn’t supposed to miss,” Rizzo recalled. “Over time, it led me to have an overall negative perception of myself, my fitness, my healthy eating – it was bad.”

Instead of beating yourself up if you stray from your workout routine, try adopting the mindset that “any movement is worth it, and everything counts,” Dr. Michelle Segar, Sustainable Change Researcher at the University of Michigan and author. of “The Joy Choice: How to Finally Achieve Lasting Changes in Diet and Exercise,” told the Wall Street Journal last year.

As noted in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, adults should try 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity and two days of muscle strengthening per week. This doesn’t mean you have to go to the gym: a brisk walk or raking the garden is also good.

Adults should aim for seven to nine hours of sleep per night. Getty Images

Not prioritizing sleep

Adults should aim for seven to nine hours of sleep per night. Chronic sleep deprivation has been linked to obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, as well as depression, anxiety and poor mental health.

“You don’t need to train seven days a week, three to four, that’s perfectly fine,” Rizzo said. “And you can’t expect to make very good progress sleeping only six to seven hours a night.”



News Source : nypost.com
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