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Watch these 11 titles before you leave Netflix in April


This month, Netflix in the US is saying goodbye (hopefully temporarily) to some of its best titles, including contemporary classics from Bong Joon Ho, Todd Haynes, Oliver Stone, and Quentin Tarantino. But we also recommend that you grab a handful of less viewed titles before they go, including a ’60s musical drama with action edge and extravaganza with growing cult following. (The dates reflect the last day a title is available.)

Murphy was a “Saturday Night Live” sensation, the star of two blockbuster movies (“48 Hours” and “Trading Places”) and all 22 years old when he shot this scorching 70-minute stand-up special in 1983. His tender age is in many ways an asset – the show sizzles with the electricity of a performer who looked, in many ways, less like a comedian than a rock star – albeit his immature perspective. on certain issues can make certain sections difficult for contemporary audiences to digest. . (Murphy apologized for the homophobic content of the special.) But those elements are fleeting, and the classics (including his impressions of James Brown and Stevie Wonder, and his childhood memories of barbecues and “moms tossing” shoes ”) are more fun than ever.

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When Todd Haynes set about making this adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel ‘The Price of Salt’, some wondered if the idiosyncratic filmmaker was starting to repeat to himself: Hadn’t he already put his mark on the 1950s melodrama with “Far From Heaven”? But Haynes was up to something quite different here, ditching Douglas Sirk tributes and richly saturated cinematography for something more akin to the beatnik spirit of his Greenwich Village setting. Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara were both Oscar nominees for their work as two women – a wealthy and in her forties, a bohemian and in her twenties – whose mutual attraction underscores their inability to be who they are “meant to be. ” to be. their social circles.

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The setup for this spin-off of the competitive baking series – which proved to be a quality comfort food during its forties – is pretty straightforward: Hosts Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood revisit some of the more technically challenging recipes. of the series and explain their good preparation themselves. The result is a fairly ingenious version of the series; while the competitive element of the pressure cooker is lost, the format allows more time for Mary and Paul to show off their skills and playfully prick each other.

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Quentin Tarantino won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay (his second, after “Pulp Fiction”) and directed Christoph Waltz to a Best Supporting Actor trophy (his second, after “Inglourious Basterds”) for this ultra-violent and wickedly entertaining pastiche of spaghetti western, southern melodrama and broad “Blazing Saddles” style comedy. Jamie Foxx plays the main character, a riff on the protagonists of countless 1960s Italian westerns, here reinvented as a freed slave seeking to save his wife from a Mississippi plantation. Waltz is the bounty hunter who assists him in his quest, and Leonardo DiCaprio is the owner of the plantation which turns out to be a tricky target.

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Four young Aboriginal women become an unlikely but effective R&B quartet in this musical drama from director Wayne Blair, inspired by a true story. Chris O’Dowd (“Bridesmaids”) stars as an Irish music promoter who overhears the band singing country songs in a talent show and becomes convinced they could make big money touring Vietnam. , listening to Motown tunes. It sounds like a simple rags-to-riches jukebox musical, but “The Sapphires” has a lot to say beyond its lyrics, following thoughtful and often heart-wrenching threads on race, identity, colonialism. and war. And beyond that, the songs are divine.

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This heartbreaking documentary from director Gabriela Cowperthwaite details SeaWorld theme park practices that keep killer whales in captivity, including focusing on the story of Tilikum, an orca involved in the deaths of three people while being held in SeaWorld Orlando. In often gruesome detail, Cowperthwaite and his team examine footage of the attack and interview employees and witnesses, investigating the deaths with the precision of a real crime film, though the question isn’t who did it, but why.

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The learning comedy of a John Hughes-style lesson in high school mostly faded when Hughes stopped making them, but this 1998 teenage treat from writer and director duo Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan took over some of that particular magic. As was often the case with Hughes’ films (especially “The Breakfast Club”), “Can’t Hardly Wait” features a bunch of specific types – the nerd, the baby, the cynic, the jock, and so on. – in a real time event and bounce them off each other to see what sparks fly. In this case, it’s a wild house party on graduation night. Lauren Ambrose, Seth Green, Ethan Embry and Jennifer Love Hewitt direct the cast of the set.

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At first glance, this testosterone-fueled cops and thieves flick by Christian Gudegast looks like a second-rate ‘Heat’ knockoff, from the inciting incident (an armored car job gone awry) to the interwoven narratives through. gloomy meditations on modern masculinity. To be clear, we are far from Michael Mann’s territory, intellectually or aesthetically. But Gudegast eventually finds his own convincing groove, ditching Mann’s angst for his own B-movie sweaty scuzzy, and he finds the perfect vessel for that posture in the form of his main man, Gerald Butler, at the top of the line. (and bottom of the barrel) presents himself as a dangerously burnt lawyer.

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Richard Matheson’s enduring novel from 1954, previously screened as “The Last Man on Earth” and “The Omega Man,” gets another essay from director Francis Lawrence (who went on to make three of the four “Hunger Games Films”). Will Smith stars as a scientist who appears to be the last man in Manhattan after a virus wipes out most of the human race, but leaves behind terrifying mutant creatures that attack at night. Elements of post-apocalyptic horror and sci-fi work as well as ever, but the real appeal of “Legend” is the skill with which its technicians convincingly dump New York City – and the eerie prescience of these images. prepandemic.

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In the mid-1980s, Oliver Stone was one of Hollywood’s most in-demand writers thanks to his Oscar-winning screenplay for “Midnight Express” and his adaptation of “Scarface”, among others. But his efforts as a director were largely ignored – until 1986, which brought in the political thriller double “Salvador” and that haunting reflection on the Vietnam War, inspired by Stone’s own experiences as an infantryman. The storyline feels personal and powerful in a way that transcends most war tales, but its exciting direction is what gives the film its fire, landing character beats, and combat sequences with equal intensity. “Platoon” won the Oscars for Best Picture and Best Director, and Stone’s cinematic future was finally sealed.

Before entering Oscar history with his simultaneous wins for Best Picture and Best International Feature (and Best Original Screenplay and Direction), South Korean director Bong Joon Ho brought his sizable gifts to American audiences with this 2014 adaptation of the French graphic novel “Le Transperceneige. By assembling an impressive international cast that includes Tilda Swinton, Octavia Spencer, Ed Harris and Chris Evans, Bong creates an exciting English variation on his signature combination of action show and social commentary.

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