Volusia Homeowners Try to Strengthen Their Homes After Hurricanes


As the wreckage of several homes cascade over a sandy cliff and more hang over the edge of Wilbur-by-the-Sea, just 3 miles off the coast, Daytona Beach Shores is also bracing for the possibility of problems. “It’s devastating. Devastating and heartbreaking,” Mayor Nancy Miller said. “We have some properties that are at risk.” The Daytona Beach Shores mayor said she felt more optimistic Tuesday than she did a week ago as state and federal governments said they would step in with support. “We are vulnerable to the next storm,” she said. Residents showed up at the first city council meeting in Daytona Beach Shores since Hurricane Nicole hit last week, expressing concern and asking solutions like a new seawall instead of a sectional wall is also going to be a lot poorer. We think that’s going to be a pretty big assessment,” said resident Pat Murphy. Miller said the director of the Florida State Emergency Management will spend the week assessing Nicole’s damage for all of Volusia County. She hopes people will return home and tourism will be up and running as soon as possible. On Tuesday, the mayor said that 10 of the 26 buildings were now considered safe for residents to return.Some buildings have lost their foundations or have virtually no support.The City Manager says that some Buildings will still have to be monitored daily. Some buildings are acceptable for residents, but with limited access monitored by the homeowners association. “No more than 25 people at any time to enter the building to gather their belongings,” the city manager said. and Nicole. Owner John Reny is now taking a closer look at his battered beachfront property. His heart goes out to his neighbors on the shore. “I feel bad. My wife feels very bad,” Reny said. Before hurricanes Ian and Nicole, Reny had 150 feet of vegetated dunes that stretched out to the ocean from her back patio. Now they are down to 15 feet. “It’s pretty catastrophic,” he said. “We fear that if we don’t get something in immediately, we’ll be like Wilbur-by-the-Sea. The ocean doesn’t forgive.” Now it’s a race against time and Mother Nature. This week, Reny is working with the city, county and state to try to get a permit for a temporary solution: to use sandbags to shore his property there to prevent beach erosion. “Our house here was built in 1925. This family has owned this land forever. And who would have ever dreamed in their wildest dreams that this was going to happen. I wouldn’t have done it,” he said. Reny hopes to have the sandbags in place by next week at the latest. And from there, he said his goal would be to find a permanent solution as a community. “We are all working together to try to find a viable long-term solution for everyone,” he said.

As the wreckage of several homes cascade over a sandy cliff and more hang over the edge of Wilbur-by-the-Sea, just 3 miles off the coast, Daytona Beach Shores is also bracing for the possibility of problems.

“It’s devastating. Devastating and heartbreaking,” Mayor Nancy Miller said. “We have some properties that are at risk.”

The Daytona Beach Shores mayor said she felt more optimistic on Tuesday than she did a week ago as state and federal governments said they would step in with their support.

“We are vulnerable to the next storm,” she said.

Residents showed up at the first city council meeting in Daytona Beach Shores since Hurricane Nicole hit last week, voicing their concerns and demanding solutions like a new seawall instead of a wall built in sections.

“We’re also going to be a lot poorer. We think that’s going to be a pretty big assessment,” resident Pat Murphy said.

Miller said the Florida State Director of Emergency Management will spend the week assessing Nicole’s damage for all of Volusia County.

She hopes people will return home and tourism will be up and running as soon as possible.

On Tuesday, the mayor said 10 of the 26 buildings are now considered safe for residents to return.

Some buildings have lost their foundations or have virtually no support.

The city manager indicates that some buildings will still have to be monitored daily. Some buildings are acceptable for residents, but with limited access monitored by the homeowners association.

“No more than 25 people at any time to enter the building to gather business,” the city manager said.

Governor Ron DeSantis announced Monday that the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will use $20 million for emergency sand placement for coastal communities impacted by Ian and Nicole.

Owner John Reny is now taking a closer look at his battered beachfront property. His heart goes out to his neighbors on the shore.

“I feel terrible. My wife feels terrible,” Reny said.

Before hurricanes Ian and Nicole, Reny had 150 feet of vegetated dunes that stretched out to the ocean from her back patio. Now they are down to 15 feet.

“It’s quite catastrophic,” he said. “We’re worried that if we don’t get something straight away we’ll be like Wilbur-by-the-Sea. The ocean does not forgive.

Now it’s a race against time and against Mother Nature. This week, Reny is working with the city, county and state to try to get a permit for a temporary solution: to use sandbags to shore up his property to further prevent beach erosion.

“Our house here was built in 1925. This family has owned this land forever. And who would have ever dreamed in their wildest dreams that this was going to happen. I wouldn’t have done it,” he said.

Reny hopes to have the sandbags in place by next week at the latest. And from there, he said his goal would be to find a permanent solution as a community.

“We are all working together to try to find a viable long-term solution for everyone,” he said.


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