Vets urge caution as bird flu reaches Nebraska

The AG Department of Nebraska confirms the first case of bird flu in the state since 2015. Nebraska is now one of 13 states with a known case in this outbreak. This new case was identified in a wild goose near a lake in Lincoln. We spoke with experts who say it was only a matter of time. They invite you to take this seriously. At Lake Holmes in Lincoln, you’ll see wild geese roaming freely. This is where one of them recently tested positive for bird flu. “They die very quickly,” said state veterinarian Dr. Roger Dudley. Experts want it to stay at one case. “Our greatest tool is biosecurity, so we’re asking people to practice the highest level of biosecurity,” said University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor and poultry veterinarian Dr. Don Reynolds. Roger Dudley and Dr. Don Reynolds say their biggest concern is with commercial and backyard birds. “It’s very devastating because they’re going to lose all of their animals,” Dr Dudley said. Fortunately, they believe the poultry industry has extreme levels of biosecurity. “The backyard chicken flocks, the small flocks, were very worried again, often their house outside or they have access to wild birds,” Dr Reynolds said. Vets say you should bring backyard flocks indoors and confine them if you can. “It’s very difficult to control a crying goose on your property. In the droppings of the group, the goose can contain the virus. And that’s it,” Dr Dudley said. It can be transmitted from bird to bird or through feeders or ponds. Once these droppings are on the ground, shoes, vehicles or animal paws can carry them. Then there is migration. “Sand hill cranes, other geese migrate through these flyways and Nebraska, so there is a major concern that needs to be addressed,” Dr Reynolds said. What about people? Well, they say you have to have very close contact, but that’s very unlikely to happen. Especially through things like eggs. As for how long this outbreak will last, Dr. Dudley hopes it will subside as the weather improves. hotter. He says the virus does not survive well in the summer. He urges people to be vigilant during the migration season.

Nebraska’s AG department confirms the first case of bird flu in the state since 2015.

Nebraska is now one of 13 states with a known case in this outbreak.

This new case was identified in a wild goose near a lake in Lincoln.

We spoke with experts who say it was only a matter of time. They invite you to take this seriously.

At Lake Holmes in Lincoln, you’ll see wild geese roaming freely.

This is where one of them recently tested positive for bird flu.

“They die very quickly,” said state veterinarian Dr. Roger Dudley.

Experts want it to stay at one case.

“Our greatest tool is biosecurity, so we ask people to practice the highest level of biosecurity,” said University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor and poultry veterinarian Dr. Don Reynolds.

Dr. Roger Dudley and Dr. Don Reynolds say their biggest concern is with commercial and backyard birds.

“It’s very devastating because they’re going to lose all of their animals,” Dr Dudley said.

Fortunately, they believe the poultry industry has extreme levels of biosecurity.

“The backyard chicken flocks, the small flocks, were very worried again, often their house outside or they have access to wild birds,” Dr Reynolds said.

Vets say you should bring backyard flocks indoors and confine them if you can.

“It’s very difficult to control a crying goose on your property. In the droppings of the group, the goose can contain the virus. And that’s it,” Dr Dudley said.

It can be transmitted from bird to bird or through feeders or ponds.

Once these droppings are on the ground, shoes, vehicles or animal paws can carry them.

Then there is migration.

“Sand hill cranes, other geese migrate through these flyways and Nebraska, so there is a major concern that needs to be addressed,” Dr Reynolds said.

What about people?

Well, they say you have to have very close contact, but that’s very unlikely to happen.

Especially through things like eggs.

As for how long this outbreak will last, Dr. Dudley hopes it will go away as the weather warms. He says the virus does not survive well in the summer. He urges people to be vigilant during the migration season.


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