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University of Minnesota interim president says agreement made to end Pro-Palestinian encampment

MINNEAPOLIS — Finals are set to begin Thursday for students at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, as pro-Palestinian protest camp remains on campus.

Jeff Ettinger, interim president of the University, sent an email to all students, faculty and staff stating that an agreement had been reached with the organizers of the student protest to end the encampment Thursday morning.

He said the 13 buildings near Northrup Mall that were closed this week will reopen at noon and the student coalition has agreed not to disrupt finals and opening ceremonies.

As of Thursday morning, student leaders had not yet confirmed Ettinger’s statement.

WCCO


Thursday is the third day an encampment has not been touched by law enforcement at the mall. Police have made no arrests on campus since April 22.

Wednesday’s protests were lively but much more peaceful than what was seen other parts of the United States in recent days.

Protest leaders met with Ettinger Wednesday, where they made it clear they would not rest until their six demands were met. Among them, a declaration in favor of Palestinian students, transparency on university investments and amnesty for arrested students.

But the U had hoped the encampment would be gone by Wednesday afternoon. In an email apparently addressed to the groups leading the protest, school leaders wrote: “As discussed at the meeting, we agree that the encampment will be dismantled and removed by 5 p.m. (Wednesday) .”

But one of the groups hit back in a statement, saying “no such agreement was reached” at the meeting.

This is a developing story. Stay with WCCO.com for more.

News Source : www.cbsnews.com
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