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Undercover cop who infiltrated notorious Hells Angels for TWO YEARS lifts the lid on his wild ride inside the underbelly of the murderous biker gang

  • Jay Dobyns, now 62, was part of the group between 2001 and 2003.
  • He described the undercover operation as a “life or death experience”.
  • The retired police officer said he saw “that the Hells Angels were ready to kill their own people”



A former undercover police officer who infiltrated the notorious Hells Angels gang for two years has revealed what it was really like to penetrate the dark underbelly of the infamous bikie gang.

Jay Dobyns, now 62, was part of the “outlaw” motorcycle gang in Arizona between 2001 and 2003.

He described the operation as a “life and death experience”, during which he witnessed “the Hells Angels were willing to kill their own people” and “how violent they can be”.

Jay, who is set to appear in A&E’s upcoming film Secrets of the Hells Angels, has now spoken to FEMAIL to candidly reveal how he caused his family “immense battle damage” and was threatened with death after his cover was finally revealed. .

Jay Dobyns, now 62, was part of the “outlaw” motorcycle gang in Arizona between 2001 and 2003.
He described the operation as a “life and death experience”, during which he witnessed “the Hells Angels were prepared to kill their own people” and “how violent they can be”. Pictured: Jay at the Office
He described the operation as a “life and death experience”, during which he witnessed “the Hells Angels were willing to kill their own people” and “how violent they can be”. Pictured: Undercover Jay
Jay has now spoken to FEMAIL to candidly explain how he caused his family “immense battle damage” and faced death threats after his cover-up was finally exposed.

Jay began by explaining that he never wanted to become an undercover cop and instead had his sights set on becoming a football player.

“I had a pretty successful college football career and never had a plan B. I always believed and assumed that I was going to play professional football, and then when the time came for it, the reality hit me and the truth is I wasn’t good enough.’

But it was popular culture that ultimately set him on a new path.

“I didn’t know what I was going to do next. At that time – it was the mid-1980s – the television show Miami Vice was very popular and as a public we had not seen this side of law enforcement through the media.

“Until now, all TV shows have been procedural: uniformed cops and detectives responding to crime scenes, conducting interviews and investigating.

“Then Miami Vice came out and it’s this undercover world and this undercover world and I wanted to be Sonny Crockett.”

Jay explained that he ended up joining the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) because it had the “premier undercover program in federal law enforcement.”

“I wanted to be among the best of the best in undercover and you start by taking baby steps – you don’t just go into long-term deep undercover,” he said.

Jay (undercover photo) explained how the ATF investigation into the Hells Angels began to intensify after two “key events that were cornerstones of the investigation.”
Jay said the Hells Angels in Arizona were “violent” and “operated with impunity.”

“You start small by gaining experience and knowledge to develop this craft.

“Every time you go out, you get a little better, even when you fail. Even when you make mistakes, you improve.

“By the time I was presented with the opportunity to infiltrate the Hells Angels, I already had 15 years of undercover experience under my belt.

“I had purchased weapons large and small, narcotics large and small, explosives small and large. I had been the lead undercover in investigating home invasions and murder-for-hire cases, so that lifestyle prepared me as best one could for an opportunity like that.

Jay explained how the ATF investigation into the Hells Angels began to intensify after two “key events that formed the cornerstone of the investigation.”

The first was the murder of Cynthia Garcia who, according to Jay, was “beaten to death in the Hells Angels clubhouse in Massa, Arizona.”

He continued: “And, when she was not yet dead, they stuffed her in the trunk of a car and they drove her out into the desert near Apache Leap in Arizona and they slit his throat.” They tried to cut off his head.

The former cop said the other flashpoint was the public riot at a casino in Laughlin, Nevada, which saw the Hells Angels engage in a bloody clash with rival group the Mongols.

Jay explained thatThese two events constituted the “backbone” of the launch of the investigation against the Hells Angels in Arizona, who were “violent” and “operated with impunity.”

One flashpoint was the public riot at a casino in Laughlin, Nevada, which saw the Hells Angels engage in a bloody clash with rival group the Mongols.
The notorious clash was described by media at the time as a ‘bloodbath’ (aftermath photo)

He was approached by a case agent within the ATF who contacted him about infiltrating the group.

My first reaction was, “I’m not the right person”… but what I had going for me was that I had an established criminal reputation in our area of ​​operations, which made me given a head start.

Finally, he decided to take the risk, adding: “I I discovered on the fly a biker gang and the world of outlaw motorcycle groups.

Jay explained: “OOne of the keys to success in undercover work is that you keep your cover story close to the truth so you can present it with comfort and confidence.

“So I never tried to present myself as a lifelong biker. I introduced myself to the Hells Angels as an arms dealer and debt collector who wanted to be part of their world.

“And I let them train me as I progressed undercover.”

Further on, he adds: “It’s a very slow process in the Hells Angels world.

“They are very paranoid and they are paranoid for good and legitimate reasons. Their paranoia keeps them from going to jail, their paranoia keeps them from going to jail, their paranoia keeps them from being infiltrated because when you arrive on the scene, they see you as one of two things.

“They see you first as a threat, as someone who wants to harm them. Then, they also see you as a victim – as someone who could possibly be taken advantage of.

“My job was to convince them that I was neither – I wasn’t a threat and I certainly wasn’t going to be a victim to them.”

Jay (pictured undercover) also conceded: “Undercover work is truly a life and death experience. »
“I introduced myself to the Hells Angels as an arms dealer and debt collector who wanted to be part of their world,” Jay said (undercover photo).

Jay, who embarked on the process, said: “You slowly start moving up the ranks and as you spend time with the suspects you start to build trust and then that trust leads to loyalty, then loyalty, in some cases, leads to love.

“But it’s a very slow and tedious process – it’s like any relationship. These things don’t happen instantly, they happen over time.

Elsewhere, Jay said: “I have always considered it an honor and privilege to wear a badge and carry a firearm in the name of defending good and innocent people from predators. and the Arizona Hells Angels were predators at that time.

“My job was to be around bad people who hurt good people – and I took that very seriously.”

But this was not done without risks.

He shared: ‘TThere was a point where my cover story was questioned by the Hells Angels and so I find myself in the Hells Angels clubhouse in Mesa – which is the same clubhouse where Cynthia Garcia was murdered.

“I knew the Hells Angels were ready to kill their own people. They murdered their own. I knew they had a habit of murdering their own members if they felt cheated or betrayed.

“I’m in a situation where my cover story is being challenged and it’s being challenged at gunpoint.

“The doors and windows are barricaded. I didn’t go out without their permission and no one came in to save me.

“I relied on all these previous events and experiences I had with the Hells Angels at that time to convince them that their suspicions were wrong.”

Jay (undercover photo) shared: ‘My job was to be around bad people doing bad things to good people – and I took that very seriously’
Jay (undercover photo) shared: ‘My job was to be around bad people doing bad things to good people – and I took that very seriously’
“I carry a lot of guilt and shame that I put my career and undercover assignments ahead of my wife and children,” Jay said candidly (undercover photo).

Jay conceded, “UUndercover work is truly a life or death experience. If you make a mistake, the Hells Angels are not the type of people who will tell you not to come here anymore.

“The Hells Angels will run a straight razor across your throat or hit you in the back of the head with a baseball bat.”

The operation eventually ended and 36 members of the Hells Angels were arrested.

But it was around this time that Jay was revealed to be an undercover federal agent.

“The Hells Angels have their doctorate in violence and intimidation – and they are very, very good at it,” he said.

“Threats of death and violence against me and my family began to emerge. My house was burned to the ground.

“These guys are no nonsense. They do not forgive or forget.

Even today, more than 20 years later, Jay remains cautious in his everyday life.

“I’m not trying to hide because I’m telling the truth. I’m not going to hide the truth. But I live my life with worry.

“I know what they are capable of. I have seen with my own eyes how violent they can be. I’m not looking for trouble. I don’t want trouble.

“I didn’t intend to ruin anyone’s life. I decided to investigate a matter that was related to my work. This is what I paid for…

Gn entert
News Source : www.dailymail.co.uk

Eleon

With a penchant for words, Eleon Smith began writing at an early age. As editor-in-chief of his high school newspaper, he honed his skills telling impactful stories. Smith went on to study journalism at Columbia University, where he graduated top of his class.After interning at the New York Times, Smith landed a role as a news writer. Over the past decade, he has covered major events like presidential elections and natural disasters. His ability to craft compelling narratives that capture the human experience has earned him acclaim.Though writing is his passion, Eleon also enjoys hiking, cooking and reading historical fiction in his free time. With an eye for detail and knack for storytelling, he continues making his mark at the forefront of journalism.
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