Trust in Supreme Court hits record high amid Roe vs. Wade


U.S. confidence in the U.S. Supreme Court has hit an all-time high this month as justices are expected to issue a decision quashing the 1973 Roe v. Wade case as early as Friday, according to a new survey.

According to a Gallup poll, only 25% of Americans have “a lot” or “somewhat” confidence in the Supreme Court, down 11 percentage points from last year.

Gallup – which has measured trust in the nation’s highest court for 50 years – said the previous level of trust was 30% in 2014.

About 43% of respondents said they had “some” confidence in the Supreme Court, while 31% said they had “very little” or “none”.

Broken down by party, the survey – released on Thursday – found a massive drop in support from Democrats and independents. Specifically, only 13% of Democrats trust the court, down from 30% previously, and about 25% of independents have confidence, down from 40% previously.

An anti-climb fence is seen outside the Supreme Court on June 23.
PA

Confidence among Republicans – who are overwhelmingly represented on the court with six conservative justices – rose by about two percentage points (37% to 39%). Yet it is considerably lower than the 53% recorded in 2020.

Meanwhile, Democrats are leading the way for the least confidence with 47% saying they have “very little” or “none.” Independents followed with 30% while only 17% of Republicans agreed.

The survey was conducted among 1,015 American adults between June 1 and June 20 and had a sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points.

Nikki Tran of Washington, holds a sign with photos of Supreme Court Justices Thomas, Kavanaugh, Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett and Neil Gorsuch during a May 3 protest.
Nikki Tran of Washington, holds a sign with photos of Supreme Court Justices Thomas, Kavanaugh, Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett and Neil Gorsuch during a May 3 protest.
PA

The findings came just a day before the Supreme Court is due to rule in Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women’s Health Organization – which concerns the legality of a Mississippi law that prohibits all abortions after 15 weeks, except in medical emergencies and fetal abnormalities.

A draft notice of the decision leaked in May, written by Judge Samuel Alito, said the court intended to rule in favor of the state and strike down Roe, citing its unconstitutionality.

Supreme Court justices are expected to rule on Roe v.  Wade this weekend.
Supreme Court justices could rule on Roe v. Wave today.
PA

It’s unclear how similar the final opinion will be to the draft, as a recent poll found a majority of Americans want the landmark abortion ruling to stay in place.

The court is expected to start publishing its opinions at 10 a.m. No other op-ed days have been publicly announced.

New York Post

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