Toyota halts production in Japan after cyberattack hits one of its suppliers: NPR


The logo of Japanese Toyota Motor is displayed at a dealership in Tokyo on February 9, 2022.

Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images

Toyota halts production in Japan after cyberattack hits one of its suppliers: NPR

The logo of Japanese Toyota Motor is displayed at a dealership in Tokyo on February 9, 2022.

Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images

Toyota had to halt production in Japan on Tuesday due to a “system failure” at one of its domestic suppliers.

The supplier – Kojima Industries, which supplies plastic and other parts to Toyota – was allegedly the victim of a cyber attack, according to several media. Toyota told NPR it couldn’t comment on specifics because the incident happened at a supplier.

The alleged attack forced Toyota, one of the world’s largest automakers, to suspend operations at 14 of its Japanese factories on Tuesday, impacting production of around 13,000 vehicles.

“We apologize to our customers and suppliers for any inconvenience this may cause,” a Toyota spokesperson said in a statement. “We will continue to work with our suppliers to strengthen the supply chain and do everything we can to deliver vehicles to our customers as soon as possible.”

The company said there was no impact on production in North America.

Although it is unclear who caused the apparent cyberattack, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said his government would investigate whether Russia was involved, Reuters reported.

“It’s hard to say if it has anything to do with Russia until we do some thorough checks,” he said, according to the outlet.

It came the same day Japan joins Western countries to restrict transactions with the Russian central bank and to impose new sanctions on Belarus.

Toyota and other automakers were forced to halt production in North America earlier this month because auto parts deliveries were blocked by protesters blocking a bridge spanning the Canada-US border.




npr

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
Back to top button