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Tom Hardy explains his surprise victory at the jiu-jitsu competition


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Tom Hardy has revealed why he secretly participated in a jiu-jitsu tournament he triumphed in last week.

The critically acclaimed actor shared his reason via Instagram on Wednesday, saying he wasn’t just competing for himself. According to The Guardian, Hardy competed in the 2022 Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Open Championship using his first name “Edward” rather than his well-known stage name.

George Miller, Charlize Theron and Tom Hardy attend the ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ premiere during the 68th Cannes Film Festival on May 14, 2015 in Cannes, France.
(Traverso/L’Oreal/Getty Images)

The star competed in the Championship, held in the UK, for a global non-profit charity that helps veterans and first responders.

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“Addiction is a difficult and complex thing to deal with, just like mental health,” Hardy said on social media. “Subjects that are both deeply personal to me and extremely dear to my heart.”

“It is an honor to be able to represent the charity and my REORG team and the great work they do to support the mental health and well-being of veterans, military members and first responders through the benefits therapeutic Jiu Jitsu and physical training,” he added.

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Last month, Hardy also won another REORG Open Jiu-Jitsu Championship title to help raise funds for veterans struggling with PTSD and other mental health issues. The “Mad Max” star is said to be a director of the nonprofit.

Actor Tom Hardy attends "Drop" premiere during the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival at the Princess of Wales Theater on September 5, 2014 in Toronto.

Actor Tom Hardy attends the ‘The Drop’ premiere during the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival at Princess of Wales Theater on September 5, 2014 in Toronto.
(Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

“Everyone recognized him, but he was very humble and was happy to take time for people to take pictures with him,” the tournament spokesperson told The Guardian. “It was a real pleasure to see him participate in our event.”

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Hardy said the sport has benefited him on a personal level by allowing him to develop “a deeper sense of inner resilience”. The 45-year-old has struggled with addiction in the past.

“A simple workout, for me (as a hobby and a private love) was fundamentally essential to further develop a deeper sense of inner resilience, calmness and well-being,” Hardy told his Instagram followers. “I cannot stress the importance it had and the impact on my life and my teammates.”


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