The racketeering trial of former state police union chief Dana Pullman and former lobbyist Anne Lynch will begin this week


Crime

“[Pullman] ran the syndicate like a criminal enterprise, running it like an old-fashioned mob boss.

Former Massachusetts state police union president Dana Pullman left the Moakley federal courthouse after a hearing in 2019. He is expected to stand trial on Monday. John Tlumacki/Boston Globe

Dana Pullman, former president of the State Police Association of Massachusetts (SPAM), was arrested more than three years ago for allegedly receiving tens of thousands of dollars in bribes from a union lobbyist and embezzling union money for personal expenses. This week, Pullman and lobbyist Anne Lynch are finally on trial.

  • The racketeering trial of former state police union chief Dana Pullman and former lobbyist Anne Lynch will begin this week

    A former president of the Mass union. State Police and a lobbyist have been charged with fraud. Here’s what we know.

  • Former state police union leader and lobbyist charged

Pullman started as a state trooper in 1987 and led SPAM from 2012 until his resignation in 2018. Lynch is the founder and former owner of lobbying firm Lynch Associates Inc.

Jury selection in the racketeering and fraud case is set to conclude on Monday, The Boston Globe reported, and opening statements will follow shortly.

SPAM consists of more than 1,500 Massachusetts State Police soldiers and sergeants. The union acted as the exclusive bargaining agent between its members and the state regarding its members’ terms of employment, according to the Justice Department. Lynch’s company represented SPAM during the time Pullman was its president in exchange for monthly payments.

Prosecutors allege that between 2012 and 2018, Pullman and Lynch conspired with individuals employed or associated with the union to organize a racketeering scheme for personal gain. They also face charges of conspiring to commit honest services wire fraud, wire fraud, obstruction of justice and filing false tax returns.

“[Pullman] wielded the syndicate like a criminal enterprise, running it like an old-school mob boss,” Joseph Bonavolonta, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Boston field office, said in 2019. “We believe Pullman and Lynch lied, cheated, and attempted to obstruct our investigation at the expense of these hard-working soldiers and taxpayers… Their actions were, without a doubt, shameful, underhanded, and fueled by sheer greed.

With the money Pullman allegedly stole from the union, he paid for decadent meals, trips, gifts and a new SUV. Pullman allegedly worked to pressure companies seeking to do business with the state to become clients of Lynch’s firm, leading to the bribe payments he received from she. These payments were sometimes disguised as “consulting fees” for Pullman’s wife.

Pullman also allegedly encouraged SPAM board members to submit fake expense reports to cover money that had been misappropriated for his personal expenses.

During the trial, prosecutors will be tasked with proving that Pullman turned a legitimate organization, SPAM, into a racketeering operation. Although the federal racketeering law known as the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was created to combat the Mafia and organized crime groups, it has also been used to prosecute those accused of racketeering within organizations. legitimate.

“I think the government will have to establish that this was not a small bribe or an occasional bribe, but it was really at the heart of how the defendant ran the state police association,” attorney Zachary Hafer, a former federal prosecutor and now a Cooley partner, told the World.

Cases like this, where the racketeering business is not a traditional organized crime institution, can be more difficult for the government, he added.



Boston

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
Back to top button