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USA News

The late-season spell of mild weather comes to an end as the first of two bursts of cold air hits Friday evening, sending temperatures plummeting.

Nature

Another threat of rain late Saturday night/Sunday, followed by a blast of cold air that could include the first snowflakes of the season by Halloween.


SET UP FOR FRIDAY LATE AFTERNOON

Significantly colder air just west of Chicago and ready to settle in


FORECAST MAXIMUMS/DEPARTURES FROM NORMAL

A significantly colder trend sets in, ending a streak of 10 consecutive days with temperatures at or above normal.

NL graphic THREE 10282023

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EARLY SEASON SNOW STORM PRODUCES A TOTAL OF 1 TO 2 FEET

Snow cover in the United States increased fivefold in just two days

EARLY SEASON SNOW animation 10282023

NL graphic FIVE 10282023

More rain arrives Saturday night through Sunday, followed by the first snowflakes of the season on Halloween.

NL graphic SIX 10282023

NL graphic SEVEN 10282023

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NL Climate TWO 10282023

Kristin Laidre — Narwhals and polar bears
“Laidre is an ecologist specializing in Arctic mammals, particularly cornered by global warming:
“Narwhals spend most of their time in deep water, in and under dense ice. They need cold water. The other species I study is the polar bear. Everything about the polar bear has to do with ice. It’s the way they move. This is how they find partners. This is how they find food and eat. This is how they get enough nutrition to successfully reproduce.

Keith Parker — Salmon
“Parker is a senior fisheries biologist for the Yurok Tribe in Northern California. Across the West, salmon stocks have been devastated by dams, water diverted for agriculture and climate change:
“The decline in the size of the (salmon) run has hurt not only people, but also Mother Earth. All these fish were decomposing and being absorbed by the forest. This is how we get ocean nutrients from trees hundreds of miles upstream.

Andrés Rivera — Mountain glaciers
“Since Rivera began studying glaciers in the 1980s, a series of globally monitored glaciers have grown from nearly seven inches per year to nearly three feet per year:
“The glacier was retreating. That was my first clue that something was going on. Today the glacier is about three kilometers further away than it was in 1982.”

Hanna Mounce — Birds of the Hawaiian Forest
“Mounce leads a team trying to save forest birds on Maui, where warmer weather is expanding the range of mosquitoes that transmit the deadly avian malaria:
“When we went to the forest. . . the forest was full of birdsong. You would hear kiwikiu when you woke up in the morning. . . Now when we go there you can walk for half a day before you encounter one of the birds.

Dee Boersma — Penguins
“For 40 years, Boersma has studied a single colony of Magellanic penguins in the coastal desert of Argentina, documenting a decline of about 1% per year:
“Penguins are dying from heat stroke. . . we had the hottest day we have ever recorded, 111 degrees in the shade. The best way for penguins to cool off is to jump into the ocean, but some of them have to walk more than a mile to get there. We had 264 dead penguins littering the colony. Some were within five feet of the water, but they just couldn’t make it.

David Obura — Coral reefs
“Obura has been studying coral reefs since 1992. During that time, the world’s oceans have lost perhaps a quarter of their corals:
“What’s driving coral reef decline is carbon dioxide, fossil fuels and overconsumption.”

Patrick Gonzalez — The trees of the Sahel
“Gonzalez is a forest ecologist and climate change scientist who studies tree death in the Sahel region of Africa. :
“Seeing these dead trees in Africa and the plight of local people motivates me to work even harder to take action against climate change, to reduce my own emissions and to encourage others to live more sustainably. »

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE IN THE NEW YORK TIMES, VISIT:
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/26/magazine/extinction-species-scientists-climate-change.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare&login=email&auth=login-email


MONITORING THE TEMPERATURE DROP

Temperatures are expected to plunge more than 35 degrees between Friday’s balmy high of 72 degrees and the forecast low of 37 degrees Saturday morning.

NL graphic EIGHT 10282023

ANOTHER RAIN OF RAIN ARRIVES LATE SATURDAY EVENING, CONTINUING AT SOMETIMES INTO SUNDAY.

Some remote northwest suburbs could even see mixed, wet snowflakes – various precipitation snapshots late Saturday night into Sunday

PRECIP animation 10282023

TRACKING THE COLDEST AIR OF THE SEASON IN CHICAGO COMING BY HALLOWEEN

Expect temperature swings of 850 mb (about a mile above the surface)

The darker blue and purple colors represent the greatest temperature deviation from normal. Temperatures are expected to moderate and approach normal by the end of next week and into the following weekend.

TRACKING COLDEST AIR animation 10282023

EXPECTED MINIMUM MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY

The growing season will end as temperatures drop below freezing on consecutive mornings next week

FORECAST LOWS 10282023

NL graphic NINE 10282023
SNOW HALLOWEEN ANIMATION 10282023

FEATURE10282023

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Nature

NBC Chicago

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