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The governing bodies of rugby federations launch an action plan to address the reduction of head impacts and concussions |  Rugby Union News


Last updated: 07/21/21 19:22

Head shocks and concussions in rugby are the subject of a new action plan

The Rugby Football Union, Premiership Rugby and the Rugby Players’ Association have launched an action plan to reduce head impacts and the risk of concussion in both elite rugby union matches and at training.

The action plan explains how science and technology are used to advance thinking to optimize player well-being and the brain health of potential players, current and past.

An increased focus on exposure to head shocks is accompanied by ongoing work to improve the level of shock and concussion management in professional gaming and the introduction of a new assessment service. brain health for retired elite players.

The area of ​​primary prevention will include the use of “smart mouthguards” during the 2021/22 and 2022/23 seasons, with the RFU calling for the 13 Premiership clubs to use them with the aim of creating new limits for the Contact training – Team Harlequins’ Men and Bristol Bears Women have already tested the technology, which allows staff to monitor head impacts in real time.

Secondary prevention will include the implementation of World Rugby’s progressive return-to-play protocols and independent concussion consultant reviews, as well as the use of real-time Hawkeye videos to aid in the assessment of head injuries in patients. women Premier 15, as well as restarting the collection of saliva samples in the men’s game (and start it in the women)

And there will be a tertiary prevention program for players following the end of their careers, with the opening of the Advanced BRAIN Health Clinic in London later in 2021 allowing the assessment and management of any former player between 30 and 55. years old who has concerns about their brain health.

The governing bodies of rugby federations launch an action plan to address the reduction of head impacts and concussions |  Rugby Union News

The governing bodies of rugby federations launch an action plan to address the reduction of head impacts and concussions |  Rugby Union News 0:31
British and Irish Lions captain Alun Wyn Jones said the team were in South Africa to win the Test Series and insists their rapid recovery from a dislocated shoulder was not just due to him.

British and Irish Lions captain Alun Wyn Jones said the team were in South Africa to win the Test Series and insists their rapid recovery from a dislocated shoulder was not just due to him.

RFU Director of Medical Services Dr Simon Kemp said Sky Sports News: “Based on our experience with Harlequins and mouthguards, there was tremendous interest from the players and coaching staff just to understand what their training intensity meant to them.

“They were very used to understanding race loads, GPS data, and acceleration and deceleration loads. What the mouthguards give them is an idea about impact and head acceleration.

“Both clubs have reported very positively on the use of this as part of the club, aside from the value of the research.”

The governing bodies of rugby federations launch an action plan to address the reduction of head impacts and concussions |  Rugby Union News

Damian Hopley admits players may be concerned about results of study showing fifth suffered brain cell abnormalities, but he supports sport to make necessary changes

RPA chief executive Damien Hopley believes the sport remains at the forefront of concussion research and safety, but admitted some of his constituents might be concerned about the results of a study by Imperial College which has shown that a fifth of the elite players are showing signs. abnormalities of the white matter of the brain.

The Drake Rugby Biomarker study, which involved the RFU, surveyed 44 elite players between July 2017 and September 2019 and the results of the second scans on almost half of them, taken a year after the first, have found that 23% had abnormalities in their brain cells.

Hopley said: “Obviously it’s running hares. It’s clear this will be a title that will scare some players off, but we have to take it in the turn of what’s going on right now, make sure we look at all of them. research available and let’s make informed answers on the back of it.

Hopley also believes current players would be in favor of reducing the full contact work done in training.

He added: “Based on the conversations we’ve had, I think the player would appreciate that. It’s about how we handle this, how we do it in the proper way, marrying the data. that we talked about.

“Trying to give some certainty about what contact is, clarification and regulation around this is an important step forward.”

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