The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson’s villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as ‘Simply the best’


Everyone loves a bad guy — and from “Simply the Best” to “The Baddest Man on the Planet,” boxing has always had fighters happy to take on the bad guy role and revel in the boos of a crowd.

There’s money in it too. As a twentieth-century pound-for-pound king realized, there’s as much money in people paying in the hope of losing (even if that defeat never happens) as there is in buying tickets to see you win.

Broner failed to deal with Maidana’s raw aggression in his shock loss and there were quite a few happy faces at the time.
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It’s not always simple: Muhammad Ali was America’s most unpopular athlete when he refused to fight in the Vietnam War in the 1960s, but Ali has spent far more of his life being considered as a hero than as a villain. All of these fighters, however, spent their best years channeling their inner Ivan Drago.

10. Adrian Broner

Modern boxing has never known a more euphoric and unifying moment than when “The Problem” was beaten in his shock loss to Marcos Maidana in 2013. This Mayweather deliveryman had talent but no consistent discipline, except when he it was about insulting opponents or (literally) flushing money down the toilet.

AB, whose nicknames range from “About Billions” to “The Can Man” (because anyone can get it) is still active and, alarmingly, is just 32 years old. But after two losses in his last four fights, Broner left his best years in shit with so many dollar bills.

9. George Foreman

Tough to rank, as Foreman pulled off one of the best “face tricks” in boxing and was a bald, burly, beloved grill-selling machine when he returned to middle age. But for the first run of his career, “Big George” was a feared and hated heavyweight.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
At his peak, Foreman was a dominant champion who possessed one of the hardest punches in boxing.
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The taciturn, sullen, monosyllabic colossus has beaten popular fighters like Joe Frazier and Ken Norton. He was expected to do the same with Ali in Africa, then he turned into a sore loser after his shock loss, saying he was drugged before the fight. What a turnaround from the graceful, jovial figure we all know today.

8. Chris Eubank Sr.

Slicking back, selfish, gazing at his fellow boxers with contempt through a monocle: The original Eubank drew in a furnace of negativity in the 1990s. His ring entrances were spectacular theater – but once on the ropes, the most British boxing fans were desperate to see him lose: against Nigel Benn, against Michael Watson, against anyone.

However, after finally suffering a loss, after 43 professional fights, opinions have softened. Now, Eubank is rightly hailed as a unique eccentric and a warrior in the ring. But he’s certainly known how to push people’s buttons for most of his long career.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
Eubank’s ego has earned him a lot of negativity
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7. Ricardo Mayorga

The hard-smoking, hard-drinking, hard-hitting Nicaraguan burst onto the boxing scene in 2003 when he annihilated undefeated 147-pound champion Vernon Forrest. However Mayorga quickly became more known for the quantity of his trash talk than for the quality of his shots.

“El Matador” played villain opposite stars Felix Trinidad and Oscar De La Hoya, ranging from nagging homophobic and ethnic slurs to accusing the two of diving into previous fights. As with all Hollywood films, however, the handsome heroes filled out this villain before the end.

6. Mike Tyson

Hard to place Tyson because his whole act was unmistakably heel: black trunks, malevolent gaze, violence off the ropes, sneering, belittling and threatening to eat the unborn children of his heavyweight rivals.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
In his prime, Tyson was so intimidating that he had fighters beat up before they even set foot in the ring.
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Yet despite all of this, Tyson — even at his worst — was as revered as he was reviled. For everyone who tuned in hoping to see Tyson lose, there was an equally large global audience praying to see him crush his poor, wide-eyed opponent. Let’s just put “Iron Mike” in the middle and hope it doesn’t offend him.

5. Naseem Hamed

Unlike Eubank, there was no underlying sweetness to “The Prince’s” cocky act. Naz, the 5-foot-3 puncher with leopard-skin trunks and a practical style, rose to fame for his signature entries involving magic carpets and cadillacs.

However, the flashy showmanship didn’t end after the top rope flipped in the ring. Hamed would taunt overmatched opponents in the heat of combat. His talent was undeniable, but his brash speech had none of the wit that made Ali’s taste palatable. Outside of Sheffield, the whole world was thrilled when Marco Antonio Barrera gave him a boxing lesson in 2001.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
Few people could fight like Hamed and his win over Kevin Kelley on his America debut was truly breathtaking.
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The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
He was one of the most entertaining British boxers in history and his arrogance won him many fans.
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4. James Toney

Abrasive, moody and menacing, James “Lights Out” Toney was one of the most relentless talkers in boxing history. Brought to the UK public via Jonathan Ross when he appeared on a Eubank-Benn special to inform them, via video, that he would be fighting them both on the same night, adding, “I’m going to beat you and the your mom’s ass.”

Probably not the news Ms Eubank or Ms Benn wanted to hear on ITV. Toney had the skills and the strong chin to back up his flamethrower mouth, but stayed in boxing too long and even had a brief misguided foray into the UFC, before finally quitting the fighting game in 2017.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
‘Lights Out’ had the ability to back up its trashy talk that shook many people
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3. Antonio Margarito

The ‘loaded gloves’ incident before his fight with Shane Mosley – when Mosley’s trainer spotted a suspicious substance on Margarito’s hand wraps – ruined the Mexican American’s reputation. Fight fans immediately became suspicious of previous victories, especially Margarito’s shock victory when he collapsed and stopped Miguel Cotto.

Cotto’s 2011 revenge against Margarito was one of boxing’s most popular triumphs. But Margarito had precedent before that, when a video was posted of him appearing to mock Manny Pacquiao’s trainer Freddie Roach, who has Parkinson’s disease. Stay classy, ​​Antonio.

2.Floyd Mayweather

No boxer has made a more deliberate and calculated decision to go wrong. Mayweather was originally marketed as the smiling, all-American ‘Pretty Boy’ – before becoming a full-fledged antagonist for his 2007 fight with Oscar De La Hoya. No clues as to which character was the most profitable – and Mayweather was a natural in his villainous role.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
Love him or hate him, people have always wanted to see Mayweather in action
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From spewing hate speech at Manny Pacquiao to his jail time for assault and battery, Mayweather has annoyed just about everyone. His huge PPV sales were at least partly based on people paying in the desperate hope of seeing him lose, but “Money” always had the final say on that.

1. Sonny Liston

The original heavyweight villain. When George Foreman and Mike Tyson each decided they’d rather be feared than loved, they both looked to the same man as a role model: Liston.

The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'
Liston, seen here, with the London gangsters, the Kray twins were the original boxing villain
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The intimidating, emotionless, crowd-controlled puncher was so hated that Floyd Patterson’s trainer/manager Cus D’Amato dodged the fight for years because he said it would be horrible for boxing. to have Liston as champion. When Liston finally got Patterson in the ring, he wiped him out in one round, then did the same in the rematch – to a cavalcade of boos.

“In movies, the good guy always wins,” Liston shrugged. “But he’s a villain who’s not going to lose.”

Dishonorable Mentions: Andrew Golota, Bernard Hopkins, Zab Judah, Billy Joe Saunders, Riddick Bowe

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The boxers who loved being Mike Tyson's villain and his outbursts at Floyd Mayweather reminding you how rich he was and Chris Eubank introducing himself as 'Simply the best'

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