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Spain imposes regulations limiting the use of air conditioners as temperatures soar


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A new energy-saving rule in Spain that limits the use of air conditioning in public spaces to reduce dependence on Russian energy comes into effect despite sweltering temperatures.

The regulation requires air conditioning to be no lower than 80.6 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest months of the year in public spaces such as stores, offices and movie theaters, even though temperatures routinely exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer months, Agence France Press reported. .

Over the next few days, temperatures in Spain are expected to hit 100 degrees Fahrenheit and stay in the mid-90s for the rest of the week.

“The purpose of the plan is to save gas for the winter just in case [Russian President Vladimir] Putin decides to cut gas supply to Europe as a result of sanctions,” said Joan Groizard, head of the Institute for Energy Savings and Diversification at Spain’s Ecology Ministry.

RUSSIA LAUNCHES IRANIAN SATELLITE INTO SPACE OVER FEAR IT WILL BE USED TO MONITOR UKRAINE

Air conditioners can be seen on a commercial building in Palma de Mallorca May 24, 2010, in Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
(Photo by Sascha Baumann/Getty Images)

This scenario “could make this winter very difficult”, he added.

The legislation will also affect Spaniards trying to heat their homes this winter and will ban homes from being heated above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

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In addition, stores will be required to turn off window lighting after 10 p.m. and any heated or air-conditioned public space must have a door that closes automatically by the end of September.

The European Commission hopes that the EU can reduce its dependence on Russian gas by two-thirds this year and be completely independent of Russian fuel by 2030 in response to the country’s invasion of Ukraine.

Aerial view of Gran Via in Madrid at dusk from Circulo de Bellas artes.  Spain

Aerial view of Gran Via in Madrid at dusk from Circulo de Bellas artes. Spain
(Stock)

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The rule was strongly pushed back by Spanish residents, Euro News reported, forcing the government to back down slightly and allow hospitals, schools and hair salons to be exempt from the rule.

“What they had dictated is nonsense,” César García, a restaurant owner in Segovia, Spain, said of the plan. “Hotels and restaurants have already suffered the consequences of the restrictions during the pandemic and now they want to impose more. We are not going to comply until we are sanctioned.”


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