Skip to content
She is only 10 years old, but she is already the CEO of her own cosmetics company: NPR


Paris Muhammad, CEO of Paris Place LLC, at the ribbon cutting ceremony celebrating the moment she made history as the youngest member of the Conyers-Rockdale Chamber of Commerce in Georgia.

Tenisha Odom


hide caption

toggle legend

Tenisha Odom

She is only 10 years old, but she is already the CEO of her own cosmetics company: NPR

Paris Muhammad, CEO of Paris Place LLC, at the ribbon cutting ceremony celebrating the moment she made history as the youngest member of the Conyers-Rockdale Chamber of Commerce in Georgia.

Tenisha Odom

From babysitting to flipping burgers, most people’s first jobs don’t compare to what Paris Muhammad does. At just 10 years old, she is CEO of her own makeup company, Paris Place LLC.

The fifth-grader from Georgia made history when he became the youngest member of the Conyers-Rockdale Chamber of Commerce in Georgia last month.

“I started my business at the age of seven,” Muhammad said. “Me and my grandmother started selling deodorants and body oils. And a year ago we added lip gloss to my collection. “

Her mother, Tenisha Odom, said she knew early on that her daughter was passionate about cosmetics.

“I was seeing little spots of makeup on her face, and I was like, ‘Are you in my lipstick or in my makeup?’” Odom said. “And she, you know, would kind of give me a sidelong eye, so I know she was doing something.”

Her makeup is already sold in beauty stores in three states – Arkansas, Georgia, and Virginia – and can be shipped across the country. Muhammad said his products are for everyone.

“My lip gloss is not sticky or too shiny. My lip glosses are also vegan and gluten free,” Muhammad said.

Muhammad said his business has really taken off this year. She has her own billboard in Atlanta, hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony, and even met celebrities. Her mother said the sky was the limit for her daughter.

“I knew she was going to be something because she always said she never wanted to work for anyone,” Odom said. “We were talking about entrepreneurship over the years. We didn’t know she was really listening.”

Muhammad hopes to have her own store one day, but for now, she will continue to grow her business while following her mother’s rule: No CEOs work school nights.

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.