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Prince Harry won’t see King Charles during UK trip for Invictus celebrations

Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation

Prince Harry on stage during the Invictus Games Foundation conversation titled ‘Achieving Global Community’ in London on Tuesday May 7, 2024.


London
CNN

The Duke of Sussex returned to the UK on Wednesday for a ceremony marking a milestone for his Invictus Games, but he will not see his father, King Charles III, during his return to the country.

Prince Harry arrived on Tuesday afternoon ahead of events and meetings linked to the biennial sporting competition he founded a decade ago.

The fifth heir to the British throne will not, however, catch up with his father during his home visit, due to “Her Majesty’s full programme”, according to his spokesperson.

“The Duke of course understands his father’s commitments diary and various other priorities and hopes to see him soon,” the spokesperson added.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation

Harry is returning to the UK for the 10th anniversary of his Invictus Games.

Buckingham Palace has made no comment on the Duke’s visit. Harry has had a difficult relationship with his extended family since he and his wife, Meghan, stepped back from royal duties and moved to the United States in 2020.

He is also not expected to meet his brother, Prince William, during his visit.

Harry, 39, does not appear to have been accompanied by the Duchess of Sussex for his visit to the United Kingdom. Their son, Prince Archie, turned five on Monday.

The last time the Duke was back in his home country was in February for a fleeting visit after his father’s cancer diagnosis was announced.

Charles continues treatment for an undisclosed cancer, but returned to public duties last week after his doctors said they were “very encouraged” by his progress.

The past few months have been a tumultuous time for the British royal family. Harry’s sister-in-law Catherine, Princess of Wales, revealed her own battle with cancer in March and asked to remain private while she undergoes treatment.

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The Duke of Sussex will attend a thanksgiving ceremony at St Paul’s Cathedral in London on Wednesday to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Invictus Games and their founding.

The first Invictus Games, an international sporting competition for injured veterans and service members, took place in London in 2014.

Harry will deliver a reading while actor Damian Lewis will recite a poem.

After the Invictus celebrations in London, Harry and Meghan will travel to Nigeria at the invitation of the Nigerian Defense Headquarters. Nigeria became the first African participant in these games last year.

The next Invictus Games will take place in Vancouver and Whistler in Canada in February 2025. More than 500 competitors from over 20 countries will compete in adaptive sports such as indoor rowing, sitting volleyball, swimming, rugby wheelchair and wheelchair basketball.

Last week, the cities of Birmingham in the UK and Washington, DC in the US were announced as shortlisted to host the event in 2027.

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News Source : amp.cnn.com

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