Parents of Buffalo and Uvalde killings testify before Congress: NPR


Zeneta Everhart, whose son, Zaire Goodman, 20, was shot in the Buffalo Tops supermarket mass shooting and survived, testifies at a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on violence army on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

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Parents of Buffalo and Uvalde killings testify before Congress: NPR

Zeneta Everhart, whose son, Zaire Goodman, 20, was shot in the Buffalo Tops supermarket mass shooting and survived, testifies at a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on violence army on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

Andrew Harnik/AP

Parents of children injured and killed in last month’s mass shootings in Buffalo, NY, and Uvalde, Texas, have implored members of the House Oversight Committee to act quickly on gun control measures.

“If after hearing from me and the others testifying here today does not inspire you to act on gun laws, I invite you to my home to help me clean the wounds of Zaire so that you can see firsthand the damage that has been done to my son and my community,” said Zeneta Everhart, mother of Buffalo shooting survivor Zaire Goodman.

The shooting at a Buffalo grocery store left three people dead and 10 injured. The shooting at a primary school in Uvalde left 17 injured and 21 dead, including 19 children.

Kimberly and Felix Rubio, parents of Lexi Rubio, one of the deceased students at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, testified virtually, calling on members to ban assault rifles and high-capacity magazines, pass the age to purchase assault weapons from 18 to 21, to implement red flag laws and strengthen background checks and repeal liability immunity for gun manufacturers. The policy suggestions mirror President Joe Biden’s list of proposals.

And Miah Cerrillo, a fourth-grader at Robb Elementary School, testified in a pre-recorded video to members that she used her friend’s blood to pretend she was dead while calling 911 to get help. assistance. She said she feared another incident could happen again.

“He shot my friend Elizabeth and I thought he was going to come back into the room so I grabbed the blood and put it all over me,” she said. Miah’s father testified in person, asking for some kind of action to help protect children in schools, noting how difficult it has been for his family since the shooting.

Parents of Buffalo and Uvalde killings testify before Congress: NPR

Felix Rubio and Kimberly Rubio, parents of Uvalde, Texas mass shooting victim Lexi Rubio 10, appear on a screen as they testify remotely at a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on gun violence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

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Parents of Buffalo and Uvalde killings testify before Congress: NPR

Felix Rubio and Kimberly Rubio, parents of Uvalde, Texas mass shooting victim Lexi Rubio 10, appear on a screen as they testify remotely at a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on gun violence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

Pool/Getty Images

Meanwhile, the DC Project’s Lucretia Hughes and Republicans’ proposed witness Women for Gun Rights have come forward to argue that more laws won’t make a difference in reducing rates of gun violence.

“You’re all delusional if you think this is going to protect us,” said Hughes, who lost his own teenage son in a gun-related incident. “At Women for Gun Rights, we believe that education is the key to safety, not ineffective legislation.”

Members of Congress have spent the past few days listening to testimonies from those affected by the recent mass shootings. Wednesday’s hearing came as House members are expected to vote this afternoon on a package of bills that would expand federal gun regulations. Despite calls for action from parents who have lost children, the House measures are expected to stall in the Senate as lawmakers move forward with separate negotiations on a narrow set of proposals.

But lawmakers in both chambers are continuing their discussions, despite the proposals unlikely to pass through both chambers and arrive at the president’s desk.

“We’re not going to cede our political power and responsibility to the Senate,” Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., who sits on the judicial panel that has pushed through the bills the House is seeking to pass, told NPR. . “We’re going to legislate in a way that responds to the immensity and gravity of the problem. … If the Senate comes back with anything watered down or less than that, we’ll have to take that into account as part of the process.”

After House testimony on Wednesday, Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Ga., told reporters he hoped a deal could be reached despite ideological divisions.

“There is always a possibility of hope,” he told NPR. “And maybe upon hearing this testimony, some of my colleagues will do the right thing.”


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