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Parents in Vail, Ariz. Did not remove school district mask warrant


The claim: Parents in Vail, Ariz. Took over the school board and removed the mask mandate

A group of parents protesting the mask warrants recently invaded a meeting in the Vail Unified School District in Arizona, triggering allegations online about the group’s takeover of a school board.

The protest followed an April 19 announcement by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to quash the statewide order that ordered K-12 schools to require masks. This gave districts the opportunity to implement their own face protection policies, which the Vail School Board planned to discuss before the meeting was canceled due to safety concerns.

While the district has disputed claims that parents have replaced the school board, some social media users say the parents’ reunion had legal effect.

“WOW. Parents from Vail, Ariz., Have just taken over the running of the school board – all by the rules. They voted in a brand new council and immediately removed the mandate from the mask. Democracy in action! Simply incredible! reads a screenshot of an April 27 Tweeter.

The tweet was shared on Instagram and Facebook on April 28 by various social media accounts, including the Donald Trump Fan Club page in a post with over 2,100 shares and 7,400 reactions.

On April 28, a Facebook user shared the tweet and wrote: “In case you were wondering what happens when you bother people’s children for too long.”

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In a post to USA TODAY, the Facebook user pointed to an April 28 video of the protest by the Hugs Over Masks Minnesota page. The other users did not return a request for comment.

What happened?

Claims that parents had elected a new school board began after videos went viral of parents organizing a rally against the mask’s mandate inside the lobby of the Vail Education Center, where a school board meeting was scheduled to take place. held on April 27.

In one of the videos, the crowd begins to cheer after a ‘board member’ says, ‘I move that the entire Vail school district be exempt from mask policies and that it be optional for all teachers. and students. “

The crowd was estimated at around 100 people. The official board meeting was canceled when parents broke into the facility while refusing to wear masks, according to KGUN-TV. A few demonstrators were armed and MPs were unable to disperse the growing crowd.

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With elected school board members absent, parents held an impromptu and unofficial election, in which they chose their own board and voted to overturn mask policies. The crowd claimed Robert’s rules allowed them to overthrow the school board.

The mandate of the mask remains in place

The school district and school board’s mask mandate remains in place and officials say the election held by the parents was invalid.

“It’s a publicity stunt,” Vail Superintendent John Carruth said, according to KGUN-TV. “A new council must be voted on by a duly elected process of the voters of this community. This did not happen last night.”

Additionally, local attorney Steve Portell told the outlet that Robert’s Order rules “don’t have the legal impact of overriding Arizona law and removing elected officials.”

Additionally, Robert’s rules require a president or president-elect to facilitate the election, which was not the case.

Darcy Mentone, director of communications and public affairs for the Vail Unified School District also told Lead Stories that the impromptu election of protesters was unofficial; the crowd interrupted a study session leading up to the meeting.

Mentone added that the elected members of the Vail school board have not resigned, as many have claimed they have adjourned for security reasons. She said that even if the meeting had taken place, the board still would not have had an opportunity to change the mask policy because members only planned to discuss mitigation strategies, not vote on them.

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The Vail United School District plans to postpone its meeting and it’s unclear whether the mask’s tenure, which is due to expire in June, will be featured as a point, according to KOLD News 13.

Our rating: False

The claim that Vail’s parents elected a new school board and removed the school district’s mask mandate is FALSE, our research shows. The parents held their own so-called election after board members left the building due to security concerns and disruption from protesters. Lawyers and Vail’s superintendent say the election was not legally effective.

Our sources of fact-checking:

  • Lead Stories, April 30, Fact Check: Parents in Vail School District did NOT take over, removed mask mandate

  • Informed Choice Michigan, April 28, Facebook video

  • David J. Harris Jr., April 29, Instagram video

  • KGUN-TV, April 27, parent rally for Vail School District to drop mask mandate in schools

  • KOLD News 13, April 29, Vail Superintendent Responds To Protests And Urges Parents To Focus On What Unites Them

  • Associated Press, April 28, school board ends meeting as parents protest mask’s mandate

  • Vail School District, April 27, board meeting

  • Tucson.com, April 30, Political Notebook: Crowds say ‘Robert’s rules’ got them to pick Vail’s new school board

  • Robert’s Rules of Order, accessed May 2, website

  • KGUN-TV, April 29, lawyer: The group’s attempt to replace Vail’s board was not legitimate

  • National Parent Teacher Association, accessed May 2, Robert’s Rules of Order-the Basics

  • Tucson.com, April 29, anti-mask protesters storm Tucson school board meeting

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Our fact-checking work is funded in part by a grant from Facebook.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact Check: Vail, Arizona Parents Did Not Remove School Mask Mandate





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