Parents behind popular social media accounts discuss revealing school controversies


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Many parents who had never seen their children’s classrooms before during the COVID-19 pandemic made an effort to expose these school controversies on social media.

Over two years of inconsistent in-person learning, parents realized that in addition to teaching the basics – math, reading, etc. – some schools also offered courses related to race and gender. Mask mandates and school closures, which have been shown to negatively impact studies, mental health and social behaviors, have also lit a fire among parents. Some became frustrated enough to start taking their grievances to Twitter, Instagram and other platforms to warn fellow parents.

A parent from Arlington Parents for Education told Fox News Digital that the extended school closures are what led them to get involved with the social media group. Arlington Parents, which is very active on Twitter, describes itself as “a bipartisan, volunteer-led coalition of parents, teachers, students, and citizens dedicated to accountability and transparency for excellent APS education. “.

“I got involved because the schools were closed,” the parent said. “And I thought public school kids should be able to go to publicly funded public schools.”

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Through remote learning, many parents have witnessed what their children are being taught for the first time.
(Stock)

The parent, who describes himself as “moderately progressive,” said teachers and administrators detected a noticeable difference in students after home learning.

“It’s been characterized by a lot of student misbehavior and a lot of lack in the basics of socializing and following the rules for younger kids and just sort of normal social interactions,” the parent said. “So I think there was a lot of mental and emotional health burden that was coming out.”

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A student boards a school bus outside Washington-Liberty High School in Arlington County, which is one of several school districts that have sued to stop the order of Governor Glenn Youngkin (R), in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., Jan. 25.  2022.

A student boards a school bus outside Washington-Liberty High School in Arlington County, which is one of several school districts that have sued to stop the order of Governor Glenn Youngkin (R), in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., Jan. 25. 2022.
(REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein)

Inside the Classroom is a Twitter account that has highlighted what it describes as radicalism in schools, including lessons believed to have been influenced by critical race theory (CRT).

Inside the Classroom said they heard about CRT and “gender stuff” in schools, initially thinking it was “a bit over the top and out of proportion”. They said they were pushed to social media after learning more and being inspired by the work done by TikTok’s popular Libs account.

“Until I realized how disgusting it was in all of our schools across the country,” Inside the Classroom told Fox News Digital. “And so I decided to start exposing that, and I’ve been on Twitter a couple of times, I’ve been banned. But I’m still doing it… Because I believe it’s important to protect our children. But as I do more and more research, I realize how evil this ideology is. And it makes me want to fight and keep covering it up until something be done.

Although CRT courses aren’t explicitly taught, Inside the Classroom said “the framework it’s built on is pushed.”

In a particular video shared by Inside the Classroom, an Iowa teacher explained how she taught her white students to be anti-racist. She criticized the state’s ban on teaching critical race theory and said there was “absolutely no problem” with certain aspects of CRT being taught in schools.

“I teach my white children that their white privilege can be used to make this country fairer for their classmates who are still marginalized by society here,” said Megan Geha, special education teacher at Des Moines East High School, in the video.

Gina, the founder of We The Parents NYC, said she was “shocked” by what she found on her daughter’s computer while homeschooling, saying her school misinterpreted its mission and shouldn’t have tried to teach her daughter “values”. She was “appalled” to see the teacher show them a video which she said was essentially suggestive of white men oppressing minorities.

“My jaw hit the ground,” she said.

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The Minnesota Parents Alliance, meanwhile, “exposes political agendas in Minnesota schools,” according to the group’s website.

Cristine Trooien, executive director of the Minnesota Parents Alliance, said she was inspired to start the group after witnessing the state’s academic “freefall,” which she says began long before COVID. His group highlighted the emphasis many schools place on “equity,” arguing that they should instead focus on improving teaching, starting with student literacy.

“I think… we spend an awful lot of time now… looking at… equity initiatives and sort of these more politically charged issues,” she said. “When I really believe that literacy – and we have so many literacy experts – and even, you know, what is the methodology that our schools adopt to help our students learn to read?”

Parent groups are urging schools to focus on academics like math and literacy instead of the equity curriculum.

Parent groups are urging schools to focus on academics like math and literacy instead of the equity curriculum.
(Stock)

“And I think there’s now this new data and notions…to really come back to this approach to phonemic awareness and the science of reading, I think it’s now become, I think, what parents ask,” she added. “And so I would like to see as a parent and I think a lot of parents agree with that, every penny and district budget and every minute of teacher time and instruction is really focused on literacy. “

At the top of the Minnesota Parents Alliance’s Twitter account is the phrase “Parents are not the problem. Parents are the solution.” Trooien said the band is committed to making sure parents remember it.

“I think parent welcoming and I think we know that the best path to student success is a really strong partnership between parents and teachers,” Trooien said.

The Minnesota Parent Alliance, she said, places great importance on communication between districts. Some of his parent followers have reached out with advice about what they’ve learned in Minnesota schools, often wondering if what they’ve heard is legal.

“They’ll tip as far as it’s like, Hey, I saw that coming home in a backpack, or that’s what’s happening in our class,” she said. . “Or maybe it’s a new policy or program that, you know, our district is adopting. And it certainly helps other parents see, ‘Okay, here is a district that is doing this or it is part of their program I am I will check and see if this is what is happening in my school it is something that bothers me or is not in line with my priorities. I want to make sure this doesn’t happen in my district.'”

Parents and community members attend a Loudoun County School Board meeting on Critical Race Theory in Ashburn, Virginia on June 22, 2021.

Parents and community members attend a Loudoun County School Board meeting on Critical Race Theory in Ashburn, Virginia on June 22, 2021.
(REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein)

Tiffany Justice of Moms for Liberty, another very active parent group on social media, said she was a former school board member who ‘loves public education’ but thinks she has been ‘captured’ by the progressive left.

“And we believe that we’re building an army of parents and sticking together in sufficient numbers will help give us a real shot at reclaiming public education in America, which absolutely needs to happen,” Justice told Fox News. . Digital.

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When asked how Moms for Liberty encourages parents to get involved, she advised them to look close to home.

“We believe that the government closest to you is the most powerful, which you should be a part of, that, you know, the government closest to you is the best government, and that’s where you can have the most of impact,” the judge said. said.


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