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Opponents of the Covid vaccine are so desperate to be seen as victims that they are hijacking the Holocaust


In 1946, Albert Einstein visited Lincoln University, a historically black university. Like many scholars who fled Nazi Germany, he found his place among black people. This is because after escaping evil, many Jews discovered that they were also not adopted in the United States. The two groups found common ground as they suffered enough fanaticism and discrimination to cause their deaths.

It is no coincidence that this hyperbolic indignation comes from people who have always had rights and never knew what true oppression is.

Three quarters of a century later, some Americans who are neither Jewish nor black also believe they are experiencing a similar oppression. Apparently being told to wear a mask and get vaccinated to stop the spread of a deadly virus means they now know what it’s like to live in Nazi Germany.

After months of ridiculous comparisons between fascism and public health measures during a pandemic, this false equivalence reached its natural conclusion when the owner of a hat store in Nashville, Tennessee, decided to sell yellow stars like the ones that Jews were forced to wear under the Third Reich embroidered with the words “Unvaccinated”.

It is no coincidence that this hyperbolic indignation comes from people who have always had rights and never knew what true oppression is. They think their children are suffering and missing their childhood because of the mask warrants. That the government has overstepped its limits by forcing people to bring them into Target. That to be vaccinated is to face genocide.

Indeed, the common thread among people who cry fascism about mask warrants and vaccine guidelines is that they come from the safest groups in American society. There is an answer to how someone might compare getting vaccinated to one of the worst atrocities in modern history: privilege.

Republicans – a predominantly white voting bloc – are most likely not to plan to get the vaccine. A recent study found that while 67% of Democrats say they have been or plan to be vaccinated, only 41% of Republicans say the same. Evangelicals are also at the very top of the list of those who refuse masks and the vaccine, which is not surprising given the messages from much of the evangelical church, with some even welcoming anti- speakers. vaccines and actively disseminating disinformation. At the same time, longtime leftist anti-vaccines have more education and higher incomes than those outside the movement.

On behalf of all of us, I would like to know why are you so determined to be oppressed? It seems clear that this population wants to claim the status of victim even if it means distorting history and the present. In a revealing statistic, 68% of white evangelicals believe that discrimination against white Americans has become as big a problem as discrimination against non-whites. Republicans, meanwhile, are much less likely than all Americans to say that Asians (37%), Hispanics (45%) or blacks (52%) face a lot of discrimination, and more likely to say than whites (57 percent) and Christians (62 percent) do.

If the most traumatic thing society has done to you is put on a mask or urge you to get vaccinated, but your victimization radar puts you on the extremely persecuted end of the spectrum, you might want to read the contents of “Project 1619” that you are trying to keep out of your child’s school before you play the victim card again. While critics claim that this project of placing slavery at the center of the American narrative is rewriting history, it actually provides an in-depth look at America’s subjugation of blacks and the contributions African Americans have made to it. country.

Even further, you should think about the modern adversity your neighbors are currently facing, such as the fact that blacks and browns have been disproportionately affected by Covid-19. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Native Americans are 2.4 times more likely to die from Covid-19 than White Americans, Latinos are 2.3 times more likely, and Blacks are almost twice as likely. American Jews face conspiracy theories and physical threats for allegedly spreading Covid-19, and Asian Americans have seen an increase in slurs and vicious attacks as they have also been blamed for the virus. In fact, some of the same people who make false equivalences between the vaccine and genocide are the ones who actively propagate this bigotry.

While there are certainly some marginalized people who do not want masks or support vaccination mandates, I highly doubt they are brazen enough to compare them to other battles they have had to fight.

When anti-maskers and anti-vaxxers attempt to assert their own oppression, they minimize – or worse, deny – the historical trauma that others in this country face.

When anti-maskers and anti-vaxxers attempt to assert their own oppression, they minimize – or worse, deny – the historical trauma that others in this country face. Instead of creating imaginary adversity, they should seek solutions for the less privileged, such as the homeless. I suggest you give time or money to those who are not so lucky; or step out of your microcosm to see how others are hurting; or visit museums to educate yourself during Heritage Months instead of saying it’s racist not to have White History Month.

At the very least, consider the fate of the Nashville hat store. It lost major suppliers, including hat makers Stetson and Goorin Bros. The owner has since apologized, but the damage has been done. If the empathy with others is too strong, at least stay silent so as not to hurt your results. So maybe you won’t feel like a victim.



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