NCAA teaches girls and women they don’t deserve to compete on equal footing


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Athletics is much more than sport. For those who participate, it can be a way of life. The lessons we learn on the field, on the track, on the court or in the pool carry over to every other part of our lives.

My years in track and field have pushed me to do things I never thought I could do. They showed me the importance of teamwork, training and competing with people I trust and respect. They helped me understand that the sacrifice and hard work is worth every hard time. And, for much of my career, athletics has taught me that everyone deserves the chance to compete fairly.

But athletics no longer teaches women and girls that.

WHAT WILL BE FOR ME AND FOR OTHER WOMEN BEATEN BY ORGANIC MALES LIKE LIA THOMAS?

Instead, the NCAA has threatened to withdraw championship competitions from states that reserve women’s sports for women. Although NCAA officials have made it clear that they want athletes to compete in events based on their gender identity — not their biological sex — they also leave final decisions and enforcement to sports administrators. individual. This allows them to assert their will without taking responsibility for the damage they cause to women’s sport.

Old Southern Utah Trail &; field athlete Linnea Saltz.
(ADF)

Meanwhile, more and more female athletes find themselves competing – not to mention showering and sharing a locker room – with male athletes.

Males have inherent physical advantages over females. They have greater muscle mass and larger lungs. They are, in general, faster, stronger, bigger and physically more resistant than females. For all of these reasons, and more, it is simply not fair to force women to compete against male athletes.

WOMEN’S ADVOCACY GROUPS QUIET ABOUT TRANSGENDER SWIMMER LIA THOMAS’ DOMINATION AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS

I discovered how unfair it was when I competed in the NCAA, playing track at Southern Utah University. Just before my senior year, I learned that an athlete who had previously been on the University of Montana men’s team would now be competing against me, identifying as a woman.

The previous year, I had accomplished more than I could have imagined. I had won the Outdoor Big Sky Conference championship in the 800 meters, qualified for the West Regional NCAA Outdoors competition, and was working towards an All-American track title. But now I was going to be competing against an athlete with immense inherent biological advantages.

Everything I had achieved so far was possible thanks to my dedication, my work ethic, my will and my endless hours of training and competition. Nothing I had accomplished was given back to me, yet my sacrifices seemed to no longer be valued.

LIA THOMAS ALSO FOR FIFTH IN 200 FREESTYLE, IS IGNORED BY COMPETITORS AS SHE EXITS THE POOL

As a male athlete, he had recorded good times for a male runner – 3:50 for the 1,500 metres. But this is the same as the world record for female athletes competing in this event. In other words, female varsity athletes were forced to compete against a man who had already broken the record for all female runners.

Suddenly, the goals I had been working towards for years were thrown out of reach.

The same thing happened to women in Connecticut, which is a state that allows men to compete in women’s events. There, high school athletes Selina Soule, Alanna Smith and Chelsea Mitchell lost irreplaceable opportunities.

Selina missed the New England Regional Championship, where she could have raced past college scouts and competed for scholarships, by just two spots — spots taken by biological men.

University of Pennsylvania transgender athlete Lia Thomas swims in a preliminary heat for the 500-meter freestyle at the NCAA Swimming and Diving Championships Thursday, March 17, 2022, at Georgia Tech in Atlanta.  ____ Transgender woman Lia Thomas (L) of the University of Pennsylvania stands on the podium after winning the 500 yard freestyle as fellow medalists (L-R) Emma Weyant, Erica Sullivan and Brooke Forde pose for a photo at NCAA Division I Women's Swimming &;  Diving Championship on March 17, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia.

University of Pennsylvania transgender athlete Lia Thomas swims in a preliminary heat for the 500-meter freestyle at the NCAA Swimming and Diving Championships Thursday, March 17, 2022, at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. ____ Transgender woman Lia Thomas (L) of the University of Pennsylvania stands on the podium after winning the 500 yard freestyle as fellow medalists (L-R) Emma Weyant, Erica Sullivan and Brooke Forde pose for a photo at NCAA Division I Women’s Swimming &; Diving Championship on March 17, 2022 in Atlanta, Georgia.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore | Justin Casterline/Getty Images)

Alanna went from second place in the regional championship to third place, by a man. And four times Chelsea have lost the State Champion title to a man. This led them to file a lawsuit through their lawyers with Alliance Defending Freedom, a lawsuit that continues today.

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When I saw the same thing was about to happen in my lecture, I spoke up. But the NCAA hasn’t changed its policy.

As it turned out, the male athlete opted out of the 800 meter race at the 2020 Big Sky Indoor Conference Championship. That gave me a window to win. But this same athlete took first place in the indoor mile, knocking a runner off the podium.

Later, at that same meet, my team competed in the Distance Medley relay against the University of Montana, anchored by their male runner.

Linnea Saltz

After I finished my part of the race, I watched my teammates thrive on the track as I had done before them, only to hear the Montana coach say something to this male athlete that I hadn’t. never heard in competition before.

He was telling the runner to slow down.

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It is the opposite of competition. But that’s the lesson the NCAA is teaching girls and women right now: that no matter how hard they try, they don’t deserve to compete on equal terms.

That’s why I, and many female athletes like me, support the many state governments that have passed laws protecting women’s sports. These states are doing what the NCAA and the International Olympic Committee refuse to do: ensure fair play and protect women’s sport.


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