Skip to content
more than 600,000 dead in the United States, lifting of restrictions in California and New York

Published on :

The United States has 600,185 deaths from Covid-19, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University on Tuesday. Thanks to their vaccination campaign, the states of New York and California have lifted the latest restrictions.

More than 600,000 people have died from Covid-19 in the United States since the start of the pandemic: a sad threshold crossed as the country gradually completes its reopening, with the lifting of restrictions in two of the most populous states .

The virus has claimed more than 600,185 people nationwide, according to benchmark figures Tuesday, June 15, from Johns Hopkins University. A “sad milestone”, lamented President Joe Biden, calling on Americans to get vaccinated “as soon as possible”.

Restrictions lifted in California and New York

Thanks to the vaccination campaign, the number of daily deaths has indeed dropped considerably, and allowed a near return to normal in most of the country.

Almost all restrictions were lifted in California on Tuesday. No more masks for people vaccinated in most public places, as well as capacity limitations for restaurants and other establishments, said Governor Gavin Newsom during a ceremony to mark “the complete reopening of the Californian economy “.


Ditto in New York, which has reached 70% of adults who have received at least one dose of vaccine, allowing the governor to announce the lifting of the latest restrictions. A symbol, knowing that New York had been, for long weeks, the epicenter of the epidemic last year, before California in turn became one of the main foci of coronavirus during the winter .

The heaviest toll linked to the coronavirus

The 500,000 death mark was exceeded at the end of February, just under four months ago. By comparison, only one month had elapsed between the milestone of 400,000 and 500,000 deaths. The number of daily deaths now stands at just over 300 per day on average, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the country’s main federal public health agency.

“There are still too many lives lost,” Joe Biden said on Monday, citing a “real tragedy”. “My thoughts are with all those who have lost a loved one,” he said from Brussels, where he was then for the NATO summit.

The United States is by far the country with the heaviest coronavirus death toll, according to official data communicated by authorities around the world, ahead of Brazil and India.

The campaign has been spurred on by the authorities since the authorization of the first vaccines in December. But its pace has since slowed down sharply and unvaccinated people still remain vulnerable to the disease.

Just over 53% of the U.S. population, or 174 million people, has already received at least one dose of one of the three vaccines licensed in the country, according to health officials. Joe Biden has set a goal for 70% of adults to have received at least one dose by July 4, National Day.

The number of new daily cases has recently started to stagnate, settling on a plateau of around 13,000 cases recorded each day.

Vaccination to combat the Delta variant

In this context, experts are worried about the arrival of the Delta variant, initially appeared in India, more transmissible and which “could be associated with more severe cases”, warned last week Dr. Anthony Fauci adviser to the House White.

This variant currently represents about 10% of cases in the country. But it could gradually replace the Alpha variant, which appeared in England, as the dominant variant.

The vaccines remain “fortunately” effective against Delta, added Dr Fauci.

“A high vaccination rate is the best way to combat the Delta variant,” Ashish Jha, a researcher at Brown University’s school of public health, tweeted Monday while expressing “concern” at its “rapid spread. “. However, about a third of the American population has not planned to be vaccinated at the moment, according to a poll in late May of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

With AFP

.



Source link