Marjorie Taylor Greene may stay on ballot, judge says, despite challenge to candidacy : NPR


U.S. Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene prepares to testify April 22 in Atlanta.

John Bazemore/AP


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Marjorie Taylor Greene may stay on ballot, judge says, despite challenge to candidacy : NPR

U.S. Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene prepares to testify April 22 in Atlanta.

John Bazemore/AP

A judge in Georgia has ruled that Republican U.S. Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene should remain on the ballot for re-election, after a group of voters and a supporting legal group formally challenged her candidacy for her role in the Capitol Riot of January 6.

Friday’s ruling from a state administrative judge says attorneys challenging Greene’s run have failed to prove that she engaged in an insurrection.

The plaintiffs had asked the state to disqualify Greene, citing a constitutional provision that prohibits members of Congress who support an insurrection from holding office.

Georgia’s Secretary of State, Republican Brad Raffensperger, will now decide whether or not to follow the judge’s recommendation. There is no indication that he would govern differently.

“There is insufficient evidence in this case to establish that Rep. Greene… ‘engaged in an insurrection or rebellion’ under the 14th Amendment to the Constitution,” Judge Charles Beaudrot wrote in his decision. “Therefore, the Court finds that the Defendant is qualified to be a candidate for representative of Georgia’s 14th congressional district.”

The plaintiffs could try to appeal the judge’s decision, but it is unlikely to be knocked out of the ballot.

Greene testified under oath last month, answering a slew of questions about the days leading up to Jan. 6 with “I don’t remember” or “I don’t remember.”

In one instance, plaintiffs’ attorneys asked her if she had spoken with then-President Donald Trump, White House staff or other members of Congress about activating martial law. Greene said she didn’t remember.

A few days later, CNN reported on a trove of text messages allegedly from White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. They included a text by Greene, who wrote that some members of Congress had raised the invocation of martial law.

While on the witness stand, the congresswoman reiterated baseless claims about voter fraud and repeatedly said her loaded rhetoric before Jan. 6 was in reference to challenging the voter count, not to a call for violence.


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