Marjorie Taylor Greene in court due to 14th Amendment provision


Marjorie Taylor Greene in court due to 14th Amendment provision

The rule was applied in a number of cases during Reconstruction, removing office holders for having previously held positions in the Confederacy. But since then, its use has been “very rare”.

  • A group of Georgia voters can challenge US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene on 14th Amendment grounds.
  • Since Reconstruction, the provision has only been cited once.
  • While the rule may now influence midterms, it could also take center stage in the 2024 general election.

A group of Georgia voters are hoping a mysterious constitutional law could knock US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene off the ballot.

Greene, R-Ga., testified Friday at an administrative hearing into a challenge to her re-election bid brought by a group of Georgia voters, who say the congresswoman helped facilitate the riot in the Capitol of January 6. The riot stemmed from efforts to prevent the certification of Joe Biden’s victory in the presidential election.

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