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Maine’s former water tower transformed into a community gathering space


In the town of East Baldwin, an abandoned roadside water tower has been transformed into the centerpiece of a new community gathering space. Ian Klepetar and his partner, Montana Morris spent several months transforming the property at Route 113 into a roadside destination. , with a pick-your-own vegetable garden, a self-service coffee station and fresh food. Klepetar said. “Food for me is my way of connecting people with each other. It’s something that can cross all kinds of lines of difference between people. We all love food, ”Morris said. The business began last summer when Klepetar came across the tower while cycling from Burlington, Vt. To Portland. He stopped and climbed it. “It’s phenomenal. It’s, like, the best view in town, ”Klepetar said. Klepetar then found the owner of the property and bought it. The ultimate goal is to preserve the tower and, moreover, to turn it into something accessible to people, so that they can climb safely, ”said Klepetar. Almost every day, Klepetar and Morris put on their safety gear and climb to the top of the tower. “There are very few things that we experience in our daily lives that give us this emotion like it gives you chills. Yes, it’s exciting, ”Klepetar said. It’s a pleasure they hope to share with anyone willing to accept a one-of-a-kind invitation to a one-of-a-kind perch. “A space inside the water tower where people can spend time, read a book, have a cup of coffee and have a unique experience in the region,” said Klepetar. Keleptar said people who don’t want to go up the tower are always welcome. On Sunday afternoon, they organize an ice cream or salad night.

In the town of East Baldwin, an abandoned roadside water tower has been transformed into the centerpiece of a new community gathering space.

Ian Klepetar and his partner, Montana Morris, have spent the last few months transforming the property at Route 113 into a roadside destination, complete with a pick-your-own vegetable patch, self-serve coffee station and fresh food.

“Right now we are trying to create a welcoming place on the ground, different amenities, the garden, the pay if forward cafe,” Klepetar said.

“For me, food is my way of connecting people with each other. It’s something that can cross all kinds of lines of difference between people. We all love food, ”Morris said.

The business began last summer when Klepetar came across the tower while cycling from Burlington, Vt. To Portland. He stopped and climbed it.

“It’s phenomenal. It’s, like, the best view in town, ”Klepetar said.

Klepetar then found the owner of the property and bought it.

They call the water tower the people’s perch because everyone is invited to perch on top of the tower.

“The long-term goal is to preserve the tower and, moreover, to turn it into something accessible to people, so that they can climb safely,” Klepetar said.

Almost every day, Klepetar and Morris put on their safety gear and climb 100 feet to the top of the tower.

“There are very few things that we experience on a daily basis that bring us that emotion like it gives you chills. Yes, it’s exciting, ”Klepetar said.

It’s a thrill they hope to share with anyone willing to accept a unique invitation to a unique perch.

“A space inside the water tower where people can relax, read a book, have a cup of coffee and have a unique experience in the region,” said Klepetar.

Keleptar said people who don’t want to climb the tower are always welcome. Every Sunday afternoon, they organize an ice cream or salad night.