Jimmy Fallon mocks CDC over recall recommendations in late-night monologue


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Late-night TV host Jimmy Fallon swept through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Monday night following questionable agency guidelines throughout the COVID-19[female[feminine pandemic.

Fallon started his joke by referencing the story of a man in Germany who received 90 injections of the COVID-19 vaccine in order to sell fake vaccine cards.

“Ninety doses!” Fallon said. “This guy could eat a fried bat for dinner and be fine.”

“And it’s boring,” he continued. “Even after 90 doses, the CDC says he’ll likely need another booster in about four months.”

THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JIMMY FALLON — Episode 1429 — Pictured: Host Jimmy Fallon arrives at his office March 22, 2021 — (Photo by: Andrew Lipovsky/NBC)

Fallon previously told a joke at CDC expense in January. Mocking a “not very helpful” NBC News headline that told New Yorkers they could see “between 2 inches and 20 inches of snow” over the weekend, the host of late night joked, “Who’s making these predictions? CDC?”

The CDC has been torn by largely conservative criticism in recent months for its fluctuating and often confusing guidance in response to COVID-19. More recently, the agency announced that it would recommend that Americans receive another booster shot.

SECOND COVID REMINDER PHOTO: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

The CDC issued some puzzling guidelines in December, including the decision to to cut the length of its recommended quarantine period for COVID patients from 10 days to five. The amendment came less than a week after the public health agency relaxed guidelines for healthcare workers who test positive, reducing the isolation period from 10 days to five days in the event of a shortage of staff.

The CDC has already been hit for confusing updated mask guidelines. Despite previous guidelines that only unvaccinated people should wear face coverings, in July the CDC changed course to say vaccinated individuals should resume wearing masks in certain situations.

Atlanta, Georgia, USA - August 28, 2011: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention entrance sign.  Sign located near the 1700 block of Clifton Road in Atlanta, Georgia on the campus of Emory University.  Vertical composition.  (Stock)

Atlanta, Georgia, USA – August 28, 2011: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention entrance sign. Sign located near the 1700 block of Clifton Road in Atlanta, Georgia on the campus of Emory University. Vertical composition. (Stock)
(Stock)

After months of seemingly conflicting directives, the CDC director Rochelle Walenski has been placed in the hot seat by the mainstream media.

“Why should Americans trust the CDC?” NBC’s Peter Alexander asked Walensky in December, noting the many mixed messages the CDC had sent about masks, booster shots, quarantine intervals, and more. Walensky responded by saying the agency was just reacting to the latest data on the virus.

“My job right now is to take all of the science and information that we have and provide advice and recommendations to the American people tailored to the science at hand,” she said. “This pandemic has given us a lot of new and updated science over the past two years, and it’s my job to pass on that science through these recommendations and that’s exactly what we’re doing.”

NBC ANCHOR ASK CDC DIRECTOR WALENSKY WHY AMERICANS SHOULD ‘TRUST’ CORONAVIRUS AMID ‘MIXED MESSAGING’

Dr Rochelle Walensky, now director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), removes her mask to speak as Joe Biden announces candidates and appointees to serve on his health and response teams against coronavirus during a press conference at its transitional headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., December 8, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Dr Rochelle Walensky, now director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), removes her mask to speak as Joe Biden announces candidates and appointees to serve on his health and response teams against coronavirus during a press conference at its transitional headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., December 8, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
(REUTERS/Kévin Lamarque)

Critics accuse late-night hosts like Fallon and the media in general of only hitting the CDC now after it seemed to lose some popularity among the American people.

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