January 6 panel expands probe into fake voter scheme with new subpoenas: NPR


Left to right: Pennsylvania State Senator Doug Mastriano, Arizona President Kelli Ward and Arizona State Representative Mark Finchem.

Paul Weaver/SOPA Images/Getty Images;Brandon Bell/Getty Images;Ross D. Franklin/AP Photo


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Paul Weaver/SOPA Images/Getty Images;Brandon Bell/Getty Images;Ross D. Franklin/AP Photo

January 6 panel expands probe into fake voter scheme with new subpoenas: NPR

Left to right: Pennsylvania State Senator Doug Mastriano, Arizona President Kelli Ward and Arizona State Representative Mark Finchem.

Paul Weaver/SOPA Images/Getty Images;Brandon Bell/Getty Images;Ross D. Franklin/AP Photo

The Democratic-led House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol is expanding its probe into fake voters tied to the 2020 election, issuing six new subpoenas, including two Republicans currently in the running.

The new wave of subpoena targets includes Kelli Ward, the chairman of the Arizona Republican Party, in addition to two GOP political candidates from the state. Doug Mastriano is running for governor of Pennsylvania and Mark Finchem is running for Arizona’s next secretary of state.

The subpoenas mark the panel’s growing gaze at an effort to introduce fake voters to former President Donald Trump as he seeks to stay in office after losing the 2020 election. Last month, the committee said issued a first wave of 14 subpoenas related to the scheme.

“The select committee is seeking information about efforts to send fake voters lists to Washington and alter the outcome of the 2020 election,” panel chair representative Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., said Tuesday. In a press release. “We are seeking records and testimonials from former campaign officials and others in various states who we believe have relevant information about the planning and implementation of these plans.”

Thompson noted that the panel has now interviewed more than 550 witnesses and expects the six new witnesses to join that list. The new requests seek testimony by mid-March and follow multiple criminal investigations into the same concerns.

Ward, the panel said, reportedly spoke to Trump and his staff about voter certification issues in Arizona and worked to pass on paperwork seeking a “substitute” voter from the Arizona Electoral College.

The Republican candidate for governor, Mastriano, was part of a plan to organize a fake Pennsylvania voters list and allegedly spoke with Trump about post-election activities, the panel said.

Committee investigators say Arizona GOP nominee, Finchem, helped organize an event in Phoenix where Trump’s legal team and others shared false allegations of voter fraud. Finchem was also in Washington, D.C. on the day of the attack on the Capitol, saying he had to provide “evidence” to Vice President Mike Pence to delay certification of the election results, the panel said.

The new subpeona targets also include two officials from Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign, Michael Roman and Gary Brown. Roman, as director of Election Day operations, and Brown, as deputy director, both promoted false allegations of voter fraud and encouraged state officials to appoint bogus voters, the committee said. .

Finally, the panel said it hoped to speak to former Michigan GOP Chairwoman Laura Cox after she allegedly saw Trump’s former personal attorney Rudy Giuliani press state lawmakers to that they reject the election results in Michigan.

The new testimony requests come after it was revealed that about a month after the 2020 election, Republicans from seven key states met and signed documents falsely claiming that Trump was or could be the winner of Electoral College votes. of their state. The documents were then sent to federal officials.

In total, the committee publicly issued 86 subpoenas, in addition to other subpoenas requesting phone and bank records, as well as quiet requests for testimony from other targets that were not announced by the committee at the time. time of issue.


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