In U-turn, Brazilian court reopens Rainforest Park case: NPR


An endemic white-fronted spider monkey, an endangered species due to habitat loss, climbs a branch in Cristalino II State Park in Mato Grosso state, Brazil, in July 2019.

Rodrigo Vargas/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Rodrigo Vargas/AP

In U-turn, Brazilian court reopens Rainforest Park case: NPR

An endemic white-fronted spider monkey, an endangered species due to habitat loss, climbs a branch in Cristalino II State Park in Mato Grosso state, Brazil, in July 2019.

Rodrigo Vargas/AP

RIO DE JANEIRO — After declaring the decision final, a state court backtracked on Monday and reopened a lawsuit that invalidates a protected area in the Brazilian Amazon. The judicial quashing is a setback for a cattle rancher dubbed the rainforest’s worst culprit.

The Mato Grosso state prosecutors’ office announced it was reopening, saying the state’s top court did not notify the office of its decision, as is required in the prosecutions. that concern the public interest. The state’s superior court upheld the annulment to The Associated Press.

Cristalino II State Park covers 118,000 hectares (292,000 acres), larger than New York City, and is located in the transition zone between the Amazon and the drier Cerrado biomes. It is home to the endemic white-fronted spider monkey (Ateles marginatus), an endangered species due to habitat loss.

In a 3-2 decision, the Mato Grosso High Court ruled that the government’s creation of the park in 2001 was illegal because it took place without public consultation. The plaintiff is a company linked to Antonio José Rossi Junqueira Vilela, which was fined millions of dollars for deforestation in Brazil and the theft of thousands of hectares (acres) of the Amazon rainforest, including inside of Cristalino II.

In 2016, the Vilela family made headlines in Brazil for being at the center of a historic crackdown on deforestation in the Amazon. Brazil’s Attorney General called him the biggest land clearer in the Amazon.

The state government did not appeal, citing technical reasons, leading the court to declare the decision final in April.

Mato Grosso, Brazil’s largest soybean-producing state, is led by Governor Mauro Mendes, a pro-agribusiness politician and ally of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, who has repeatedly said Brazil has too many protected areas and pledged not to create more. .

The legal events have occurred in recent months, but it was only last week that the local press announced the dissolution of the park, triggering the mobilization of Brazilian environmental organizations. Now that the trial has reopened, the state attorney’s office plans to appeal to higher courts nationwide. In the meantime, the state government cannot cancel the establishment of the park as it announced last week.

“The park continues,” said Edilene Amaral, legal consultant at the Socio-Environmental Observatory of Mato Grosso, a nonprofit network, in a statement. “Any activity incompatible with full protection remains prohibited and subject to sanctions.”


npr

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
Back to top button