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How intermittent fasting, protein pacing can lead to weight loss

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According to a new study from Arizona State University, practicing protein boosting—spreading protein intake evenly throughout the day—and intermittent fasting—limiting meals to certain times—is better for gut health, loss weight and metabolic responses than simple calorie restriction.

27 overweight or obese women and 14 men were divided into two groups: one followed a heart-healthy low-calorie diet, while the other followed a low-calorie diet incorporating intermittent fasting and protein pacing.

Participants following an intermittent fasting and protein boost diet significantly reduced their gut symptoms, increased their beneficial gut bacteria, lost more weight, and lost more body fat, according to an Arizona State University study. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Both groups were monitored for eight weeks for changes in their weight, body composition, gut bacteria and metabolic health.

Participants following an intermittent fasting and protein boost diet significantly reduced their gut symptoms, increased their beneficial gut bacteria, lost more weight, and lost more body fat.


“A healthy gut microbiome is essential for overall health, particularly in the management of obesity and metabolic diseases,” said Karen Sweazea, principal investigator of the ASU study. Getty Images/iStockphoto

The fasting/paced group lost an average of 8.81% of their initial body weight, while those on a calorie-restricted diet lost only 5.4% on average. The calorie-restricted group also received worse news regarding their metabolic health.

In findings published last week in the journal Nature Communications, researchers determined that the intermittent fasting protocol increases beneficial gut microbes linked to a lean body type and better health while increasing protein levels in blood linked to weight loss.

“A healthy gut microbiome is essential for overall health, particularly in the management of obesity and metabolic diseases,” said Karen Sweazea, principal investigator of the ASU study.

“Gut bacteria influence how we store fat, balance glucose levels, and respond to hormones that make us hungry or full,” she continued. “Disruptions to the gut microbiota can lead to increased inflammation, insulin resistance and weight gain, highlighting the critical role of gut health in the prevention and management of metabolic disorders. »

Intermittent fasting has been linked to weight loss, a lower risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, decreased inflammation, and improved immune function. But research has also cast doubt on its purported benefits.

A recent major study found that those who limit their eating to a window of less than eight hours per day are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who eat more than 12 to 16 hours per day. Medical experts also caution that intermittent fasting is not for everyone.

Consult your doctor if you have diabetes, kidney stones, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or other health conditions before starting an intermittent fasting program.

News Source : nypost.com
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