HarperCollins workers on strike : NPR


HarperCollins employees went on a one-day strike earlier this summer. The workers have been in negotiations with the company since December 2021.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images


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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

HarperCollins workers on strike : NPR

HarperCollins employees went on a one-day strike earlier this summer. The workers have been in negotiations with the company since December 2021.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Union members at HarperCollins, one of the nation’s largest publishers, today began an indefinite strike. Workers and supporters gathered outside the company’s offices in New York this morning to voice their demands.

The action comes after a long bargaining process, with workers demanding higher wages, stronger commitments to diversify the workforce and better family leave. The roughly 250 unionized workers are represented by UAW 2110 and include people working in design, marketing, advertising and sales. These employees have been working without a contract since April.

“What we’re asking for is fair pay,” said Stephanie Guerdan, associate editor at HarperCollins Children’s Books and shop steward at the HarperCollins Union.

In the months leading up to the strike, workers’ messages focused on meager wages as the company reported record profits in 2021. According to a recent release, the average salary for HarperCollins employees is $55,000. . The minimum wage is $45,000.

“None of this is an amount you can live on in New York,” said Guerdan, who added that the company insists employees can travel to Manhattan offices at least one day a week. .

HarperCollins, which is owned by News Corp, has not yet responded to a request for comment.

The striking workers ask authors, agents and freelancers to decline any new business with the company – but to continue working on any existing agreements or contracts.

A number of authors and booksellers pledged their support for the strike on Twitter, including Elise Bryantwho wrote “As a HarperCollins author (and former teacher union member), I stand in solidarity with the @hcpunion. There are so many brilliant people working so hard to make our books a reality, and they deserve a fair contract and decent pay.”




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