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Elisabeth Moss makes a great British spy in the new FX drama : NPR

Elisabeth Moss plays British spy Imogen Salter in The veil.

Christine Tamalet/FX


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Elisabeth Moss plays British spy Imogen Salter in The veil.

Christine Tamalet/FX

The new FX series on Hulu The veil is a spy show about several different spy agencies – from the United States, England and France – all pursuing the same goal. They want to uncover the details of a new alleged 9/11-style terrorist plot emanating from the Middle East and stop it before it happens.

Sometimes these organizations work together, sometimes they work against each other. But throughout the case, the most crucial agent in solving the case is a British super-spy temporarily under the name Imogen. She is played by Elisabeth Moss, from Mad Men And The Handmaid’s Taleand at the end of the six episodes of The veil, I was convinced that this was Moss’ best role and performance to date. She is incredible.

As a secret agent, Imogen has many secrets that are slowly revealed as the miniseries progresses. She’s a damaged soul with a haunted past – which, on her latest mission, proves to be a valuable asset. She was tasked with locating and befriending a woman who recently surfaced in a refugee camp on the Syrian-Turkish border.

The woman, named Adilah (Yumna Marwan), claims to be of Algerian descent and from France – but several spy agencies suspect her of being the elusive mastermind behind the impending terrorist plot. Imogen’s mission is to locate Adilah, who is being kept in the camp after being attacked and stabbed by other refugees. Imogen offers to help Adilah escape, while getting close enough to try to determine her true identity, motivations and target.


Elisabeth Moss and Yumna Marwan look more alike than initially thought in The veil.

Christine Tamalet/FX


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Christine Tamalet/FX


Elisabeth Moss and Yumna Marwan look more alike than initially thought in The veil.

Christine Tamalet/FX

The terrorist Imogen hunts is known as Djinn al Raqqa – in folklore, a shapeshifting genie who can take any form. Is Adilah really Djinn al Raqqa hiding in plain sight? Or is she as innocent as she claims? Imogen, herself a shapeshifter of sorts, uses all her spy skills to gain Adilah’s trust, aiding her in her quest to cross the borders and return to Paris, where her young daughter is waiting.

Their journey is fascinating, each seeking to discover the other’s secrets while protecting their own. It’s a bit like Country where you, the viewer, are unsure of each character’s true motivations. And as the two women go off the grid and spend time together, dodging all the authorities who try to locate them, their relationship continues to deepen.

In this way, The veil it’s a bit like Thelma and Louise. Except that sometimes, it’s rather Thelma c. Louise. Both characters are delightfully unpredictable. In one scene, Imogen takes Adilah to a smuggler who she hopes will give them new passports and identities to travel to Paris. Imogen’s plan is to have them pretend to be singers and belly dancers. But their cover proposal is threatened when the smuggler decides to test them a bit by demanding that Adilah show off her skills – which she does, leaving Imogen and the smuggler suitably impressed.

These two actors are incredibly nuanced and well-matched in these roles – captivating as adversaries, and even more so if they decide to become allies. The writer and creator of The veilSteven Knight Peaky Blinders And All the light we can’t see, explores their relationship brilliantly. But he also continues to escalate the terrorist plot and track the many agents and agencies trying to foil it. Josh Charles, The good wife And Sports evening, who is presented as an aggressive CIA agent on French soil – an ugly American in Paris. He plays his role perfectly.

Anyway, The veil, At its core, is the story of two shapeshifting survivors who are more alike than they suspected – and whose awareness of this fact may, or may not, stop a horrific terrorist attack. It’s quite a journey – and quite a drama.

Gn entert
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Eleon

With a penchant for words, Eleon Smith began writing at an early age. As editor-in-chief of his high school newspaper, he honed his skills telling impactful stories. Smith went on to study journalism at Columbia University, where he graduated top of his class. After interning at the New York Times, Smith landed a role as a news writer. Over the past decade, he has covered major events like presidential elections and natural disasters. His ability to craft compelling narratives that capture the human experience has earned him acclaim. Though writing is his passion, Eleon also enjoys hiking, cooking and reading historical fiction in his free time. With an eye for detail and knack for storytelling, he continues making his mark at the forefront of journalism.
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