Demi Burnett, graduate of the “Bachelor”, diagnosed with autism


Demi Burnett has been diagnosed with autism and asks fans to be “open-minded”.

The former ‘Bachelor’ star revealed the news via Instagram over the weekend with a series of slides explaining the disorder and how to support someone with autism.

“POSSURE A TRIGGER WARNING I DON’T KNOW BUT HEADS HIGH,” Burnett, 26, wrote in the long caption. “I did a psychological evaluation and I am autistic. There is a huge stigma when it comes to autism. I encourage you to be open-minded and to accept.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that can lead to social, communication, and behavioral problems, in which the person may interact, behave, or learn differently from others, according to the CDC.

Half Burnet
“I did a psychological evaluation and I am autistic”, wrote the former “Bachelor” on Instagram.
Instagram/demi_not_lovato

Burnett said she plans to share more about the story of her “evaluation” and how she “got to this point” at a later date.

“All I want is to have a better quality of life ❤️,” she continued. “I want to make sure anyone who feels/felt like me can know that you’re really not alone. It can get better! And most importantly, it’s not your fault ❤️.

Burnett starred in the 2019 season of Colton Underwood’s “The Bachelor.” She then returned to the franchise for seasons 6 and 7 of “Bachelor in Paradise.”

She made history with Kristian Haggerty by becoming the first same-sex couple to get engaged on the show. They called off their engagement in October 2019.

Demi Burnett
Burnett has been part of the “Bachelor” franchise since his debut in Colton Underwood’s season.
ABC via Getty Images

Last month, Burnett revealed in a since-deleted Instagram post that she was experiencing emotional breakdowns “every few hours.”

“This is going to be the hardest thing to post and I’m so embarrassed but I’m going to be real,” she wrote at the time, per “Entertainment Tonight.” “My ego is livid. Happy new year, it’s me 24/7, I do nothing to envy, I’m not “happy”, I’m not social.”

She added: “I’m constantly thinking and crying and trying to figure it all out. Countless hours of blaming myself for whatever caused pain… I feel pretty shitty/overwhelmed most of the time. BUT I KNOW THAT I GROW EVEN IF IT HURT, IT IS WORTH IT.

In another post shared a few weeks later, Burnett said she was “better” after seeking professional help.

“I have wonderful people around me during this self-healing. It’s so important to have people to talk to about your thoughts. Your therapist and someone you trust,” said she wrote, “I have to remember that it’s okay to ask the right people for help. And sometimes it’s appropriate to ask your friend to help you think of sherbet at mango on a beach instead of all your worries ❤️‍🔥.”



New York Post

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