COVID vaccinations for children under 5 could start in late June: NPR


White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha speaks on June 2 about COVID-19 vaccinations for children and highlighted Pfizer’s recent request to the Food and Drug Administration to clear its vaccine to be used in children under 5 years of age.

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COVID vaccinations for children under 5 could start in late June: NPR

White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha speaks on June 2 about COVID-19 vaccinations for children and highlighted Pfizer’s recent request to the Food and Drug Administration to clear its vaccine to be used in children under 5 years of age.

Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The White House outlined federal government plans to make the first COVID-19 vaccines available for very young children.

COVID-19 vaccinations for children under 5 could start right after the June 16 holiday.

During a White House briefing on Thursday, Dr. Ashish Jha, the White House’s COVID-19 response coordinator, said if the Food and Drug Administration clears vaccines for younger children soon after a consultative meeting June 15, shipments of the first 10 million doses could begin arriving in medical offices as early as the following weekend.

Advisors from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are also expected to step in. Ultimately, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky would have to give the go-ahead before the vaccination could begin.

“We expect vaccination to begin in earnest as early as June 21 and continue throughout this week,” Jha said.

Jha said every parent who wants to vaccinate their baby (6 months and older), toddler or any other child under the age of 5 could likely do so within weeks of the vaccines becoming available.

This timeline is consistent with previous FDA and CDC decisions on COVID-19 vaccines.


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