COVID reinfection rate, quarantine guidelines – NBC Chicago

COVID reinfection rates are rising, experts say, but what does this mean for the pandemic and what are the chances of someone getting COVID a second time?

Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic in Illinois today:

Have you been exposed to anyone with COVID? Here’s what to do

With the increase in highly transmissible COVID variants in the United States and Illinois, experts say the odds of knowing someone with COVID or contracting it yourself are increasing.

“If you think you have a cold, if you think you have allergies, there’s a good chance right now with the amount of COVID around that it’s COVID,” said Dr Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health.

With several Chicago-area counties below a “high” community level for COVID and more residents testing positive for the virus or being exposed to someone who has it, many are wondering what to do next.

Learn more here.

How soon could you catch COVID again after the initial infection?

After being infected with COVID-19, how long are you protected by antibodies and when could you contract the virus again?

Although questions have been asked over the past two years, the answers have changed as new variants are discovered.

The omicron variant, for example, has led to a major shift in “natural immunity”, with many previously infected people likely to be re-infected with the new version of the virus.

Timeline of COVID symptoms: signs to expect with the virus and when

For those who test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, what signs should you watch for and how long might they last?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of COVID can appear anywhere from two to 14 days after a person has been exposed to the virus. You can end isolation after five full days if you have been fever-free for 24 hours without using fever medication and your other symptoms have improved.

Learn more here.

2 new Omicron subvariants are on the rise in the Midwest, US: CDC

Two new omicron sub-variants known as BA.4 and BA.5 begin to gain traction in the United States

Both subvariants are now part of several subvariants, or “sublineages,” of the omicron variant of COVID-19 tracked by the CDC alongside BA.2.12.1, BA.2, B.1.1. 529 and BA 1.1, among others.

“They were previously included in one of the other subvariants because we keep tabs on them,” Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady said Tuesday.

Learn more here.

New Omicron subvariants: what we know about BA.4 and BA.5

Two new omicron subvariants known as BA.4 and BA.5 are gaining traction in the United States, but how transmissible are they and what do we know about them?

Here’s a breakdown of the most recent mutations and what they could signal in the pandemic.

The dominant mutant of the coronavirus and the new subvariants contain the ghost of the pandemic past

The coronavirus mutant that is currently dominant in the United States is a member of the omicron family, but scientists say it spreads faster than its omicron predecessors and is adept at escaping immunity.

Why? Because it combines the properties of omicron and delta, the country’s dominant variant in the middle of last year.

A genetic trait reminiscent of the pandemic’s past, known as the ‘delta mutation’, appears to allow the virus ‘to escape pre-existing immunity from vaccination and previous infection, especially if you have been infected by the omicron wave,” said Dr. Wesley Long, a pathologist at Houston Methodist in Texas, that’s because the original omicron strain that swept the world didn’t have the mutation.

Learn more here.

You isolated yourself for COVID, but you still have a cough. Are you still contagious?

So you tested negative for COVID-19, but you still have a cough. Are you considered contagious?

According to Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady, coughs can persist for up to a month after testing positive for the virus, even if a patient is no longer contagious.

“The cough tends to be what lingers,” Arwady said. “It doesn’t mean you’re still contagious. It’s that you’ve had a lot of inflammation in your airways and the cough is your body’s attempt to keep pushing out any potential invaders and allow them to calm down. So… I wouldn’t consider you contagious.”

Learn more here.

Novavax COVID vaccine: what makes it different, when it might be licensed

Americans may soon get a new COVID-19 vaccine option — shots done with more proven technology than current versions.

Novavax applied to the Food and Drug Administration to authorize its adult COVID-19 vaccine in late January and after long delays, the FDA is expected to decide within weeks whether or not to authorize Novavax’s vaccine.

So what exactly is Novavax and what should you know about the vaccine? Here is a breakdown.

What to know about COVID testing: Accuracy, inconclusive results, weak lines and more

As COVID cases continue to rise in Illinois and parts of the United States and tests become widely available, many are wondering if their results are accurate, if they are reading them correctly, and how often they are reading them. must test.

Here’s a breakdown of some of the most asked questions about COVID testing and what the experts are saying.

How to calculate your COVID isolation or quarantine time, according to the CDC

With several Chicago-area counties below a “high” community level for COVID and more residents testing positive for the virus or being exposed to someone who has it, many are wondering how long they should quarantine. or isolate themselves.

First, you will need to know the difference between whether you should quarantine or self-isolate. Those who think they have been in contact with someone with COVID and who are not vaccinated should self-quarantine. Those who test positive, regardless of their vaccination status, should self-isolate, according to the CDC.

For those who are vaccinated, however, the guidelines are slightly different.

Learn more here and check out the calculator.

Eligibility for COVID booster injections: who is eligible now for the 1st and 2nd boosters?

As COVID cases rise in Illinois and parts of the United States as summer approaches, many are wondering what vaccines they can get and when.

Currently, not everyone is eligible for a second COVID booster shot, but experts are urging anyone who hasn’t yet received their first booster dose to get one.

“I really, really want to stress, as we enter this high-risk state, that we need the people of Chicago to get up to speed with the recalls,” said Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady. Chicago Public Health, late last month, as the city entered for the first time. the “high community level”.

So who is eligible for which shots and what do we know what lies ahead?

Here is the latest.

Here’s what to do if you test positive for COVID, according to CDC guidelines

With a recent spike in COVID-19 cases and several Chicago-area counties at a “high” community level, what should you do if you test positive for coronavirus or have been exposed to someone who has it? ?

Health officials have issued warnings to take precautions, especially in areas where the risk of transmission is increasing.

Here’s a rundown of advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on what to do if you test positive or if you think you’ve been exposed to someone who has.

COVID vaccines for children under 5: when could injections start? The last timing

With federal regulators set to decide whether or not they plan to allow COVID vaccines for children under 5 this month, when could parents expect the shots? begin ?

Families have been lucky enough to protect the nation’s smallest children as the highly contagious omicron subvariants continue to spread.

The country’s 18 million children under 5 are the only age group not yet eligible for vaccination.

Learn more here.

How long do COVID symptoms last? Here’s what we know so far

For those who test positive for COVID and have symptoms, how long could they last?

With COVID cases on the rise in Illinois and parts of the United States, local health officials have issued warnings to take precautions, especially in areas where the risk of transmission is increasing.

But for those with symptoms, how long they might last remains unclear.

Learn more here.

How accurate are COVID home tests? Here’s what you need to know

If you think you have been exposed to COVID or might have it, how accurate are the results of a home test?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “positive self-test results are highly reliable.”

Negative results, however, may not rule out infection, especially in people with symptoms of COVID-19, the CDC says.

“If it’s positive, it’s positive, like we don’t care about false positives,” Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady said Thursday.

Learn more here.

How soon can you test positive for COVID after an infection?

If your COVID test is positive, how long could it last?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some people who get COVID-19 may have detectable virus for up to three months, but that doesn’t mean they’re contagious.

When it comes to testing, however, PCR tests are more likely to continue to detect virus after infection.

Learn more here.

NBC Chicago

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
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