Brain cancer patient plots new treatment plan for rare and deadly DIPG


Brain cancer patient plots new treatment plan for rare and deadly DIPG

Jace Ward had one goal when he died of a brain tumor a year ago: to ease the way for others. A year later, her mother is still pursuing that dream.

Lisa Ward’s son, Jace, has been gone for exactly a year now. But his impact on caring for children with brain cancer continues. Lisa makes sure of that.

Jace, from Wamego, Kansas, was 20 and a sophomore at Kansas State University when he was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, DIPG, a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer that typically strikes young children. . Affecting about 300 Americans a year, DIPG extends its tentacles through the brainstem where functions such as breathing and movement are controlled.

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