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Ben Davison explains how Tyson Fury took Deontay Wilder’s vicious punch that sent ripples through his body


Ben Davison explained how Tyson Fury was able to resist Deontay Wilder’s vicious right hand that brought down the WBC heavyweight champion.

“The Gypsy King” had to come off the canvas twice in the fourth round to make an incredible comeback and retain his world titles.

Fury was knocked out twice by Wilder in their trilogy fight
Getty

Having had the “Bronze Bomber” to the ground in the third, Fury ate the first clean right hand that Wilder was able to land in one of their three fights and it had the desired effect.

The 6-foot-9 slugger had the opportunity to practice his best “Bambi on Ice” impression in front of a large crowd at T-Mobile Arena.

Davison was the man who designed Fury’s incredible tactics for the first fight with the American in 2018, a fight where he had to climb off the ground twice.

And the 28-year-old took to Twitter to explain how his close friend was able to take the clean shot and get up.

Ben Davison explains how Tyson Fury took Deontay Wilder’s vicious punch that sent ripples through his body
The clean right hand sent ripples across the body of the ‘Gypsy King’

He wrote: “The instinct and timing to prepare for impact and give only your forehead, tucking your chin was the key to being able to stand up!”

Davison was replaced by SugarHill Steward by Fury in order to take a more aggressive approach to the second and third fights, a ploy that worked because he got two knockouts.

And Steward admits he had to restore the 33-year-old’s composure after the two falls.

He told Boxing Social: “I’m telling you I don’t really remember it, but at that point it wasn’t about a reversal.

Ben Davison explains how Tyson Fury took Deontay Wilder’s vicious punch that sent ripples through his body
But Fury found the answer to stand up and stop Wilder
Frank Micelotta / FOX

“That’s what everyone wants to know. It was just me explaining how to fight, what to do.

“I don’t remember saying anything about a knockdown like ‘oh watch that’ it was just ‘get back to boxing’.”

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