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Ames family said they moved after racist incidents with neighbors


An Ames family said they had to be uprooted because of racist remarks made by their neighbors. Clarissa Ghostbear’s children are her world. The mother of two would move mountains if she could to protect them from anything. In the case of her family, she and her husband left their home to avoid a situation they feared would turn violent. “He said, ‘I’ll take care of you guys.’ He says, ‘if you want me to take care of it, I take care of it,’ “Ghostbear said. The “he” in question is the family’s former neighbor. Ghostbear and her husband confronted him and another woman for allegedly hitting their car on August 17. “As soon as the girlfriend got involved, she was like, she was the main one spitting racist stuff at us,” Ghostbear said. They quickly called the police as the situation worsened. “We didn’t expect anyone to go to jail because they didn’t physically touch us,” Ghostbear said. “But it still wasn’t dealt with the way we thought was fair.” Department. Ames Police said under Iowa code this was not considered a hate crime. “It has to be accompanied by some other element or criminal act for us to file a hate crime,” Tuttle said. Trespassing, assault, or any act of criminal mischief are all names of offenses under the Iowa code for what constitutes a hate crime. “Our officer actually spoke with our county attorney’s office about this,” Tuttle said. “And again, they agreed with him at the time, there weren’t enough charges.” “It hurts,” Ghostbear said. “We just want to move on.” After several restless nights of little sleep, the ghost bear and his family decided to move. There is a new sense of security. But she said that with the law as it currently exists, that doesn’t mean she’s comfortable. “You shouldn’t feel like it always has to be a battle, or you have to look over your shoulder when you find people like that in your neighborhood,” Ghostbear said.

An Ames family said they had to be uprooted because of racist remarks made by their neighbors.

Clarissa Ghostbear’s children are her world. The mother of two would move mountains if she could to protect them from anything.

In the case of her family, she and her husband left their home to avoid a situation they feared would turn violent.

“He said, ‘I’ll take care of you guys.’ He says, ‘if you want me to take care of it, I take care of it,’ “Ghostbear said.

The “he” in question is the family’s former neighbor. Ghostbear and her husband confronted him and another woman for allegedly hitting their car on August 17th.

“As soon as the girlfriend got involved, she figured she was the main one spitting racist stuff at us,” Ghostbear said.

They quickly called the police as the situation worsened.

“We didn’t expect someone to go to jail because they didn’t physically touch us,” Ghostbear said. “But it still hasn’t been handled the way we thought was fair.”

“Of course, the language used was offensive, and it was terrible and shouldn’t be used,” said Commander Jason Tuttle of the Ames Police Department.

Ames Police said under Iowa code this was not considered a hate crime.

“It has to be accompanied by some other element or criminal act for us to file a hate crime,” Tuttle said.

Trespassing, assault, or any act of criminal mischief are all names of offenses under the Iowa code for what constitutes a hate crime.

“Our officer actually spoke with our county attorney’s office about the matter,” Tuttle said. “And again, they agreed with him at that point, there weren’t enough charges.”

“It hurts,” Ghostbear said. “We just want to move on.”

After several restless nights of little sleep, the ghost bear and his family decided to move. There is a new sense of security.

But she said that with the law as it is now, that doesn’t mean she’s comfortable.

“You shouldn’t feel like it always has to be a battle, or you have to look over your shoulder when you find people like that in your neighborhood,” Ghostbear said.

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