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A ‘slime magnet’ robot could save lives by digging into our insides


This potential treatment may not be for the delicate.

Did you accidentally swallow a magnetic ball? Don’t worry: Hong Kong scientists have created a state-of-the-art “squishy robot” that can be magnetically manipulated to retrieve inadvertently ingested objects, among a myriad of other real-world applications.

A case study detailing the advanced cybernetic invention was recently published in the journal “Advanced Functional Materials”.

“The ultimate goal is to deploy it like a robot,” co-creator of the goo-bot, Li Zhang, from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, told the Guardian.

Zhang and his team reportedly concocted the breakthrough slime by mixing neodymium magnet particles with borax, a household detergent, and polyvinyl alcohol resin, the first ingredient to magnetically control it, Reuters reported. They then coated the toxic magnetic particles with silica to make them hypothetically safe for use inside the human body.

The resulting product has “visco-elastic properties” – meaning it behaves like a liquid or a solid depending on the level of force applied. Think of a fun-sized liquid metal T-1000 from “Terminator 2,” if it was designed to help rather than harm.

“When you touch it very quickly, it behaves like a solid,” Zhang said. “When you touch it gently and slowly, it behaves like a liquid.”

“The ultimate goal is to deploy it like a robot,” said goo-bot co-creator Li Zhang.
ZUMAPRESS.com
A ‘slime magnet’ robot could save lives by digging into our insides
Baffled Twitter users have compared the magnetic blob – which can form shapes including a “C” – to the eponymous space parasite from “Venom”.
ZUMAPRESS.com

If that wasn’t enough for SyFy Channel, the Magnetic Globe can also heal itself, form ‘C’ and ‘O’ shapes, and even conduct electricity. In fact, the bot’s abilities seemed so outlandish that social media thought it was an April Fool’s joke when it debuted on April 1, the Guardian reported.

However, weird pierced video shows a soft-bodied robot gathering wires, wrapping around objects like “The Blob”, navigating passages as narrow as 1.5mm and even glomming after being mercury-cut from a broken thermometer.

Scientists believe the globule could boast a range of essential applications, such as “transporting harmful things” and “switching and repairing circuits”, according to the study.

More importantly, perhaps, it could potentially extract objects that have been accidentally ingested by people – an essential function given recent horror stories of people swallowing objects ranging from needles to car keys. No word on whether the “Flubbery” substance works on objects accidentally lodged in people’s urethra.

A ‘slime magnet’ robot could save lives by digging into our insides
“I think I’d rather anything that was swallowed pass naturally rather than ingesting what looks like magnetic turd,” scoffed one opponent.
ZUMAPRESS.com

The goop has garnered mixed reactions on social media, with an onlooker judging him “a little scary.”

“I think I’d rather anything that’s been swallowed would pass naturally rather than ingesting what looks like magnetic turd.” scoffed an opponent.

Others, including official “Sony” accountcompared the Dark Spot to the eponymous space symbiote from the “Venom” movies.

Others saw it as a vicious Trojan horse that the government could use to implant hardware under the guise of performing invasive surgery.

“Yeah, as they’re going to spend millions developing this to recover accidentally swallowed items,” said a conspiracy theorist on social media. “Right. Implant maintenance is more like “.

“Don’t be afraid of the living, controllable robot that can slip into your body”, growled another doomsday. “The glob is your friend. The world only wants to help.

A ‘slime magnet’ robot could save lives by digging into our insides
“When you touch it very quickly, it behaves like a solid,” Zhang said. “When you touch it gently and slowly, it behaves like a liquid.”
ZUMAPRESS.com

Luckily, as many Twitter users have pointed out, the slimeball isn’t sentient.

“It’s not smart. It has no parts,” retorted a realistic Twitter. “It’s just a drop that you move with magnets.”

Zhang explained that while, for now, the robo-glob is not self-sustaining, “we still view it as basic research – trying to understand its material properties.”



New York Post

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