Health

61% of US adults will have cardiovascular disease by 2050: report

61% of American adults will likely suffer from some type of cardiovascular disease in the next 30 years, as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity become more common, warns the American Heart Association (AHA).

“We recognize that the cardiovascular health landscape will change over the next three decades due to the coming tsunami of rising health care costs, an older population living longer, and more growing number of people from under-resourced populations,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the AHA. A declaration.

Cardiologist and health economist Dhruv S. Kazi predicts a “near perfect storm” that will see the prevalence of high blood pressure rise from 51.2% to 61%, that of obesity from 43.1% to 60, 6% and that of diabetes 16.3%. at 26.8%.

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States since the founding of the American Heart Association in 1924, while stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Akarawut – stock.adobe.com

As a result, more than 184 million Americans will be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease by 2050, up from 128 million in 2020, according to projections released Tuesday by the AHA.

The organization says the disease will cost $1.8 trillion, which includes $1.4 trillion in direct health costs as well as “indirect costs,” such as premature deaths and lost economic productivity. The AHA reports that direct health care costs related to cardiovascular disease totaled $393 billion in 2020.

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States since the AHA was established in 1924, while stroke is the fifth leading cause of death.

Cardiovascular disease refers to several conditions, including heart attacks, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, vascular disease, congenital heart defects, stroke, and high blood pressure.


Illustration of a heart
Cardiovascular disease refers to several conditions, including heart attacks, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, vascular disease, congenital heart defects, stroke, and high blood pressure. DVS – stock.adobe.com

Among these gloomy estimates, there is some good news. The AHA expects that people will become more physically active, smoking will become less popular, and their eating habits will improve slightly in the coming years.

The organization says the approval of GLP-1 drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy “could also lead to a step change in our medical approach” to diabetes and obesity.

In the meantime, the AHA calls for widespread access to affordable, quality health care and more funding for cutting-edge research into cardiovascular prevention and treatment.

“Our aging population requires an improved cardiovascular workforce and infrastructure, including access to long-term care facilities and resources,” Brown said. “We need to do a better job of helping our children and their families recognize the impact that health choices made today will influence our health for years to come. »

How to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease

  • Eat a diet that emphasizes whole foods, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, nuts and seeds.
  • Make exercise part of your daily routine: Adults should get 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week, while children should get 1 hour every day.
  • Stop smoking, e-cigarettes and vapes
  • Get more sleep: Most adults need seven to nine hours a night, while children often need eight to 16 hours depending on their age.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Manage your cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure

News Source : nypost.com
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