3-month-old baby rescued on flight to Orlando by retired nurse


The retired nurse who saved a 3-month-old baby on a Thursday night flight from Pittsburgh to Orlando International sat down with WESH and shared her amazing story. Tamara Panzino was already in vacation mode 35 minutes into her Spirit Airlines flight. read my book, pay no attention and have my headphones on. And I heard a flight attendant say, “we have a baby that’s not breathing,” Panzino said. Shortly after, an announcement came over the loudspeaker: “Is there a doctor on board?” Panzino said she got up and ran to the back of the plane. “I had no idea if the baby was choking, if the airway was clear,” Panzino said. “I didn’t know what I was dealing with. I saw a baby. The head was back. Blue lips and her skin turning blue. Clearly in distress. Don’t breathe. And my heart sank. “Even though Panzino is a retired nurse, her years of experience kicked in. A series of questions revealed that the child was motionless when she stopped breathing.” I gave the baby to dad. He held her while I massaged her sternum, a sort of aggressive chest jerk. Make the baby react by pinching it. Try to make him cry or take a deep breath,” Panzino said. They moved to the front of the plane. “The baby’s color has started to improve. I was so happy and just kept shaking it aggressively,” Panzino said. Panzino did not have to perform CPR and called the response a team effort. was free at home. The baby was going to be good. The color has returned. I heard breathing sounds. I heard (a) heartbeat. Oh, my God, total relief. Panzino pushes back against being called a hero. “This is not a hero story. It’s a community that comes together and everyone volunteers to help with what their knowledge can do. I’m glad I was there,” Panzino said. After a day of decompression, Panzino is ready for her and her husband’s Caribbean cruise from Port Canaveral this weekend.

The retired nurse who saved a 3-month-old baby on a Thursday night flight from Pittsburgh to Orlando International sat down with WESH and shared her amazing story.

Tamara Panzino was already in vacation mode 35 minutes into her Spirit Airlines flight.

“I was reading my book, I wasn’t paying attention and I had my headphones on. And I heard a flight attendant say, ‘we have a baby that’s not breathing,'” Panzino said.

Shortly after, an announcement came over the loudspeaker, “Is there a doctor on board?”

Panzino said she got up and ran to the back of the plane.

“I had no idea if the baby was choking, if the airway was clear,” Panzino said. “I didn’t know what I was dealing with. I saw a baby. The head was back. Blue lips and her skin turning blue. Clearly in distress. Don’t breathe. And my heart just fell.

Although Panzino is a retired nurse, her years of experience have paid off. A series of questions revealed that the child was motionless when she stopped breathing.

“I gave the baby to dad. He held her while I massaged her sternum, a sort of aggressive chest jerk. Make the baby react by pinching it. Try to make him cry or take a deep breath,” Panzino said.

They moved to the front of the plane.

“The baby’s color has started to improve. I was so happy and just kept shaking it aggressively,” Panzino said.

Panzino did not have to perform CPR and called the response a team effort.

“Spirit had everything we needed on board, and before we knew it, within minutes the baby was home free. The baby was going to be good. The color has returned. I heard breathing sounds. I heard (a) heartbeat. Oh, my God, total relief.

Panzino refuses to be called a hero.

“This is not a hero story. It’s a community that comes together and everyone volunteers to help with what their knowledge can do. I’m glad I was there,” Panzino said.

After a day of decompression, Panzino is ready for her Caribbean cruise with her husband from Port Canaveral this weekend.


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